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Hi everybody...i'm new to this forum. I'm an English student and of course i have one grammar question for you...

My question is, what is the right way to say:

"look forward to do sth"

"look forward to doing"

"look forward doing"

"looking forward to do"

"looking forward to doing"

"looking forward doing"

Is any of the above expressions completely wrong? Is there any difference in formality or difference between American and British English? I've noticed that you have already discussed some of the above expressions, however, i'm mostly interested in the form "look forward doing" or "looking forward doing", so can anyone please give his/her explanation whether the expression is correct or not.

Tnx for your answers!

Regards,

Manicku
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Comments  
This is the idiom:

look forward to
http://www.answers.com/topic/look-forward-to
Don't try to invent things.

This is incorrect:
"look forward doing" (not hits on it at the New York Times)

but this is OK at the New York Times:

A Nod to Lieberman (for a While, at Least)

... individual and I look forward to serving with him.& ...

Hello Manicku-- and welcome to English Forums. In my book, only 'look forward to + -ing sth' is correct usage, and the other permutations that you have offered are wrong. Of course, the main verb can appear in various forms:

I have looked forward to seeing them for 6 months.
I am looking forward to seeing them now.
I would look forward to seeing them if I liked them.

etc.
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Thanks for the answers. Still...what about the following sentences (they are all google.com hits):

We have done things that had never been done before and we look forward doing it again for our clients in the satellite

Thanks again and we look forward doing business with you in the future

I look forward seeing it in action

I last saw Bowie in 1978 at Western Springs in Auckland, but look forward seeing him again

Bring on the Greenman this weekend and we look forward seeing you there

Is this just slang? If yes, British or American?

Regards,

Manicku
Hi, Manicku

People can't guarantee to input only correct English on webpages. So some of the google hits are just grammar mistakes.
ManickuThanks for the answers. Still...what about the following sentences (they are all google.com hits):

We have done things that had never been done before and we look forward doing it again for our clients in the satellite

Thanks again and we look forward doing business with you in the future

I look forward seeing it in action

I last saw Bowie in 1978 at Western Springs in Auckland, but look forward seeing him again

Bring on the Greenman this weekend and we look forward seeing you there

Is this just slang? If yes, British or American?

Regards,

Manicku

I agree with the other posters. Look forward seeing... and look forward doing... both need to. Sometimes people write a sort of abbreviated form of English, leaving out certain words. And correct or not, whatever is written may show up in an internet search. But someone who is learning a language should not start by leaving out words.
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Yes, they are just typographical mistakes, Manicku. On personal and non-commercial websites, few people seem to proofread what they have written.
Hi guys...thank you for your answers...however, i still have two more questions:

1) Is there any difference between "look forward to" and "looking forward to"?

2) After "forward to" we put the verb in -ing form or infinitive?

Thanks again

Regards

Manicku
Hi Manicku

1) Other than the fact that one is the simple present tense and the other is present continuous tense, the main difference to me is that "I'm looking forward to" sounds a little friendlier and "I look forward to" sounds a little more formal.

2) The phrasal verb "look forward to" is never followed by an infinitive. The word 'to' is a prepostition in this case and you always need the -ing form of a verb after a preposition.
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