What does it take for there to be a lynching?
The M-W dictionary seems to allow for other than hanging.
But my impression is that no one in the USA would consider someone who was beaten to death to have been lynched, even if the other qualifications were met (anger, suspicion or bad behaviour (a crime or smiling at a white woman), done without a trial). Or any other method of killing, other than hanging.
Is there any difference in the Britain or Canada from the meaning in the USA?
I can't use my webbrowser, so any quotation of US or British definitions would be helpful, too, but personal knowledge of usage is probably more important.

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
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What does it take for there to be a lynching?

From OED, but it appears the Spanish got there first, saying it came from Judge Lynch in Virginia in 18th century.
Orig. U.S.
trans. To condemn and punish by lynch law. In early use, implying chiefly the infliction of punishment such as whipping, tarring and feathering, or the like; now only, to inflict sentence of death by lynch law.

1836 Niles' Reg. 1 Oct. 69/1 Some personal friend of Mr. Bronx..proceeded tothe mansion of judge Bermudez, with a view to Lynch him. 1839 MARRYAT Diary Amer. Ser. I. III. 240 It may appear strange that people should be lynched for the mere vice of gambling. 1856 EMERSON Eng. Traits (1857) 154 The prison was burst open by the mob, and George (of Cappadocia) was lynched, as he deserved. 1884 SIR L. H. GRIFFIN Gt. Repub. 151 It is..unreasonable to insist on the guilt of an unfortunate who has been lynched after an acquittal in open court.
transf. 1839 LONGFELLOW in Life (1891) I. 329, I have Lynched all the trees, {em}that is, tarred them.
¶App. misused for: To render infamous.

1835 DISRAELI 9 May in Corr. w. Sister (1886) 37 If all the O'Connells wereto challenge me, I could not think of meeting them now. I consider and everyone else that they are lynched.
linchar.
(De Ch. Lynch, juez de Virginia en el siglo XVIII).
1. tr. Ejecutar sin proceso y tumultuariamente a un sospechoso o a un reo.

Pablo
What does it take for there to be a lynching? The M-W dictionary seems to allow for other than hanging. ... of killing, other than hanging. Is there any difference in the Britain or Canada from the meaning in the USA?

That's certainly taught me something new. I had no idea that the etymology was from a proper name.
If my ignorance is typical, then yes it probably is (now) used in BrE in a slightly different sense. Extra-judicial punishment by the mob, yes, but not necessarily involving hanging (or even death).
Regards
Jonathan
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What does it take for there to be a lynching? ... the Britain or Canada from the meaning in the USA?

That's certainly taught me something new. I had no idea that the etymology was from a proper name. If my ... BrE in a slightly different sense. Extra-judicial punishment by the mob, yes, but not necessarily involving hanging (or even death).

BrE uses "lynch mob".
Figurative:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/jeremy clarkson/article757025.ece

Cornered by the green lynch mob
Jeremy Clarkson
More literal:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1209497/Driver-flees-lynch-mob-trying-help-dying-toddler-knocked-down.html

Driver flees lynch mob after trying to help dying toddler he knocked down

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
What does it take for there to be a lynching? ... the Britain or Canada from the meaning in the USA?

That's certainly taught me something new. I had no idea that the etymology was from a proper name.

He didn't actually lynch anyone, that is hang him (or kill him), and it had nothing to do with race either when the word was closely related to him. The wikipedia article has a lot to say, a lot more than I already knew, but iirc it was when there was no local court functioning and he took it upon himself to punish some Tories, or something.
If my ignorance is typical, then yes it probably is (now) used in BrE in a slightly different sense. Extra-judicial punishment by the mob, yes, but not necessarily involving hanging (or even death).

Thanks.
Regards Jonathan

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
What does it take for there to be a lynching? The M-W dictionary seems to allow for other than hanging.

lynch
Etymology: lynch law
Date: 1836
to put to death (as by hanging) by mob action without legal sanction

And for 'lynch law' they have
Etymology: William Lynch ?1820 American vigilante
Date: 1811
the punishment of presumed crimes or offenses usually by death without due process of law
But my impression is that no one in the USA would consider someone who was beaten to death to have ... crime or smiling at a white woman), done without a trial). Or any other method of killing, other than hanging.

Whence derives your 'impression'? Because M-W's research has clearly suggested to them that hanging, whilst often seen, is not a sine qua non.
Is there any difference in the Britain or Canada from the meaning in the USA?

No. OED has:
trans. To condemn and punish by lynch law. In early use, implying chiefly the infliction of punishment such as whipping, tarring and feathering, or the like; now only, to inflict sentence of death by lynch law.

Interesting perhaps to see this cite there:

1839 Longfellow in Life (1891) I. 329, I have Lynched all thetrees,-that is, tarred them.
I can't use my webbrowser, so any quotation of US or British definitions would be helpful, too, but personal knowledge of usage is probably more important.

Certainly there are people who insist that only hanging can constitute a lynching, but since there is ample evidence of other accepted meanings it is clearly wrong to insist that there can be no others.

An early (failed) attempt to introduce legislation on the issue was the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill of 1918
The text is here:
http://womhist.alexanderstreet.com/lynch/doc1.htm
You see that 'lynching' is not defined but clearly covers any means by which a mob puts a person to death without lawful authority.
John Dean
Oxford
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
What does it take for there to be a lynching? The M-W dictionary seems to allow for other than hanging. ... any quotation of US or British definitions would be helpful, too, but personal knowledge of usage is probably more important.

So far, my impression is that those who looked the word up and repeat what the dictionary says, say it means more than hanging. But iirc every American except one who said what the word meant to them said it it only meant hanging.
And afaict, only one Brit has replied, and he says the word is used more broadly in the UK than just hanging.

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
What does it take for there to be a lynching? ... the Britain or Canada from the meaning in the USA?

That's certainly taught me something new. I had no idea that the etymology was from a proper name. If my ... BrE in a slightly different sense. Extra-judicial punishment by the mob, yes, but not necessarily involving hanging (or even death).

Admittedly, I left England a long time ago, but I don't believe lynching includes non-fatal punishment anymore. Perhaps you're thinking of kangaroo courts.

Rob Bannister
That's certainly taught me something new. I had no idea ... mob, yes, but not necessarily involving hanging (or even death).

BrE uses "lynch mob". Figurative: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/jeremy clarkson/article757025.ece Cornered by the green lynch mob Jeremy Clarkson More literal: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1209497/Driver-flees-lynch-mob-trying-help-dying-toddler-knocked-down.html Driver flees lynch mob after trying to help dying toddler he knocked down

Good point. Now I see how the non-death idea crept in.

Rob Bannister
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