Lectori Salutem!
I have been asked (because I am supposedly a native-english speaker) for the meaning of the phrase "bag it up".
I am familiar with "to bag it" meaning to abandon some pursuit, but I fear that "to bag it up" is different. For context may I refer you to the lyrics of the eponymous song which may be consulted at

Jitze
Lectori Salutem! I have been asked (because I am supposedly a native-english speaker) for the meaning of the phrase "bag ... For context may I refer you to the lyrics of the eponymous song which may be consulted at Jitze

Personally I've always taken this to mean the same as just "bag it" (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=2&q=bag%20it )

In other words, in the context of Ms Halliwell's song she's addressing a man and suggests he takes his poor attitude and "bags it" - ie gets rid of it by placing it in a figurative bag. The end result being that she's in control, so is the one referred to in the final line: "who's wearing the trousers now".
Lectori Salutem! I have been asked (because I am supposedly a native-english speaker) for the meaning of the phrase "bag ... For context may I refer you to the lyrics of the eponymous song which may be consulted at Jitze

When I saw the subject line, why did I somehow think someone would quote that song? Who'd've thunk it that Jitze Corperus bees a Spice Girl fan. Her only hit-ish thing in America was "Look At Me", the album's first single. Actually, it wasn't even a hit. When it Italy, I couldn't escape her "Scream If U Wanna Go Faster" and "It's Raining Men" videos on their numerous (YES, MORE THAN ONE) channels that played nothing but MUSIC VIDEOS ("music" stations actually SHOWING MUSIC how's that for a novel concept?). But, I'd also heard of her hit Euro single "Bag It Up", thanks to the multi-culturalism of the net...
Still, I find it interesting that after all this time, I'm still not really certain what the phrase means. I'm guessing that it means something like "finish it off". I guess it'd really depend on context though. At the end of the check-out line in a supermarket, your goods are "bagged up". You can tell the bagger to "bag it up" to let them know that you'd rather have your items in a bag than carry them out by hand. I'm sure the phrase has been applied, more metaphorically, to a slew of other situations by now.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Jitze Couperus wrote on 12 Jan 2005:
Lectori Salutem! I have been asked (because I am supposedly a native-english speaker) for the meaning of the phrase "bag ... that "to bag it up" is different. For context may I refer you to the lyrics of the eponymous song

Wrong: "concatenation of clichés" is more like it. And why is she alluding to Bill Cosby (Coz)?
which may be consulted at

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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I have been asked (because I am supposedly a native-english speaker) for the meaning of the phrase "bag it up".

Dear Jitze,
Can't help you, but here's an unhelpful suggestion. It may be the case that, in colloquial English, either "up" amounts to an adverb meaning "completely" or "thoroughly", or it combines with verbs to form a more emphatic phrasal form, perhaps something like "per" in Latin.

This is what I would understand if I witnessed someone buying a length of material, and heard said person say, "Could you measure it up for me?". Consider also (though I'm unsure if these are entirely parallel cases): "Weigh up that meat, would you?", "Please read up on quantum physics for the exam", "Phone him up and see what he thinks"... Perhaps it's a spectrum and this usage is more established with some verbs than with others.
I doubt it up whether you can do this with any verb whatsoever, but I'm unsure up of what the limitations are...
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Regards,
VI, who's an Aust English speaker, and who's never heard Ms Halliwell's song
http://kenm.mydeardiary.com /