Dear all,

I would need somome to say if possible to say:

"I do not like somone raises the voice with me"

I doubt the use of "with" being proper here, but I can not find an alternative.

Please also note that I found on the dictionary "to speak up" could it be right in this sentence? Other verbs "to shout" or "to scream" but I don´t think they are correct when I need to say "raise the voice" just a little....

Hope I was clear and make understand my question

Thanks

Pamela
This is the way it is expressed. Raising one's voice to means "to talk in a loud voice (to)"

It implies that the person is agitated, upset or angry with you.

"I do not like somone to raise their voice to me."

"I do not like somone raising their voice to me."

I do not like somone who raises their voice to me.
Hi and thanks!!

I do understand now :-) thanks!

Is it wrong: "I don´t like someome who raises his voice to me"?

When can I use "to speak up"?

Cheers

Pamela
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Dear all,

I would like to know if it is possible to say:

"I do not like somone raises the voice with me" No, it is not correct English.

I doubt the use of "with" being proper here, but I can not find an alternative. You are correct. "With" is not proper English.

Maybe, the sentence you are searching for is: "I do not like it when someone raises their voice to me"

Please also note that I found on the dictionary "to speak up" could it be right in this sentence? No, not really. "To speak up" does not necessarily mean to raise one's voice. Raise one's voice connotes irritation or the beginnings of anger. Other verbs "to shout" "I do not like it when someone shouts at me" could work, but it's not as formal or effective as "raise one's voice". "or "to scream" "I do not like it when someone screams at me" is also possible, but it's not as polite as raies one's voice and the verb "to scream" means to give a long, loud, piercing cry or cries expressing excitement, great emotion, or pain.
but I don´t think they are correct when I need to say "raise the voice" just a little....You're correct

I Hope I was clear and that I make myself understood.

Thanks

Pamela
Hi John!

first of all thanks for correcting the first part of the post, I did not think enough before writing.

I get that "to speak up" is not correct in that context but I would be grateful to you if you could mention few examples where to use this verb. In my dictionary I find it as synonym for "to raise the voice".

Then..I don´t know why you add the "it" in this sentence: "I do not like it when somone......." I don´t know if there is some grammatical reason or what else??

Lastly, I understood I can use both "at" or "to" when I say "He raises his voice at me or to me"

Cheers

Pamela
first of all thanks for correcting the first part of the post, I did not think enough before writing. My pleasure.

I get that "to speak up" is not correct in that context but I would be grateful to you if you could mention few examples where to use this verb. In my dictionary I find it as synonym for "to raise the voice".

Hello! Hello! Please speak up, we have a terrible connection!

Don't mumble your words, Billy, speak up clearly so you can be heard by everyone.

As your director, I must insist that you speak up so that those patrons in the back of the theater may hear you!

Then..I don´t know why you add the "it" in this sentence: "I do not like it when somone......." I don´t know if there is some grammatical reason or what else?? Yes, its grammatically correct and most native speakers would insert "it" when explaining their feelings or emotions to others. It's not essential but it makes the sentence flow correctly. Many speakers of Slavic languages have a hard time with articles and prepositions. They don't see the need for them. The fact is, it's just good English.

Lastly, I understood I can use both "at" or "to" when I say "He raises his voice at me or to me" Actually, I say both. The correct and proper usage is "to", but the common usage is both.

Cheers Best wishes,

Pamela John
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Hi John!

thanks, now it is much clearer.

When I speak on the phone and I can not hear the person speaking with me, I can say "can you speak up please".

The rest is very clear, thanks!

Best wishes

Pamela
Could you speak up please? I can't hear you clearly.

Not only is that excellent English, it's highly professional as well.

Regards,

John
thanks, got it!

Regards

Pamela
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