Hello,
My native language is Dutch and I'm learning English. I have to put the words in correct order. I have doubts about two sentences.
1 two / rooms / bed and breakfast / I / to / would like / reserve / at /your
I would like to reserve at your two rooms bed and breakfast.
2 and / husband / would like / room / I / My / double / with / en-suitebathroom / an / preferably / a
My husband would like a double room and I preferably with an en-suite bathroom.
Thanks.
On 25-Apr-2006, "rpaeps" (Email Removed)
wrote in message (Email Removed):
Hello, My native language is Dutch and I'm learning English. I have to put the words in correct order. I ... would like / reserve / at / your I would like to reserve at your two rooms bed and breakfast.

"I would like to reserve two rooms at your bed and breakfast."

"Reserve" requires a direct object.
2 and / husband / would like / room / I / My / double / with / en-suite bathroom / an / preferably / a My husband would like a double room and I preferably with an en-suite bathroom.

That's possible, but not very idiomatic. I think it's more likely the intended order, with a slightly different meaning of course, is:
"My husband and I would like a double room, preferably with an en-suite bathroom."

Jim Heckman
I would like to reserve two rooms at your bread and breakfast.
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Word order in English is generally more important than it is in other language, for various reasons.
In English, statements usually follow the order of: Subject+Verb+Object+Complement+Adverbial(s)
You're trying to separate the verb from the object with a prepositional phrase, which is a kind of adverbial. This is a common mistake in English, and any good grammar book for English language learners would point this out. One of the easiest and probably the best one for you to get your hands on would be English Grammar in Use , 3rd edition, Raymond Murphy, Cambridge University Press. This topic is covered in Unit 109 in that book.