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Every language, until it ceases to (speak / be spoken) at all, is in a state of continual change.

In the above sentence, they say 'speak' is the correct answer.

I'm ok with the answer, but I don't see why we can't use 'be spoken.'

In the following sentence, as far as I know, we can use both 'to blame' and 'to be blamed.'

• Which driver was to blame for the accident?

To me, 'be spoken' is a bit quirky, but but we can say 'quirky' is wrong.

Can you tell me why 'be spoken' is wrong?
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Hi,

Every language, until it ceases to (speak / be spoken) at all, is in a state of continual change.



In the above sentence, they say 'speak' is the correct answer.

I'm ok with the answer, but I don't see why we can't use 'be spoken.'



In the following sentence, as far as I know, we can use both 'to blame' and 'to be blamed.'



• Which driver was to blame for the accident? The common and idiomatic way to say it is 'Which driver was to blame?'

You could say 'Which driver was to be blamed', but it would be very uncommon. It sounds a bit like he was innocent but the police wanted to make it seem like he was guilty.

To me, 'be spoken' is a bit quirky, but but we can say 'quirky' is wrong.

Can you tell me why 'be spoken' is wrong?

'Speak' is wrong here. A language does not speak. It's people that speak a language.

'Be spoken' is correct. It's just passive voice A language is spoken (by people). There's nothing quirky about saying that.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thanks, I appreciate it.