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hi there,

My teacher gave me comments on my essay. Here is his comments: The language is strictly to the point, without being too direct. I thought 'strictly to the point' should refer to the contents of my essay, which means I have not included any irrelevant information. I don't understand why my teacher wrote like that.

thanks in advance

simon
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I don't understand your complaint, Simon. It is a complimentary comment.
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He said, bascially, that you said exactly what needed to be said, without including extra information, and without being so direct that it sounded harsh. As Mr. M said, it's a compliment.
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Comments  
hi there,

I dont understand his comments: 'The language is strictly to the point, without being too direct.'

simon
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Hi there,

Language, to my understanding, means grammar so I just wonder if the word 'language' collocates with 'to the point'. Since 'to the point' means expressing something very important or suitable for the subject being discussed, it should be the contents that are to the point, but the grammar to the point. What do you think?

Simon
Language included grammar, vocabulary, structure, phraseology, register-- all of the use of the English language. Your teacher indicates that all are appropriate, though I have a feeling now that s/he may be going a little easy on you.