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I can't believe my mom is visiting. I moved here seven years ago and my mother has not been here (to visit).

Is 'to visit' redundant?

Thanks!
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First of all, I'd recommend using the 'is going to visit' or 'is planning to visit' in your first sentence if for no other reason than to make it absolutely clear that your mom hasn't arrived yet.
No, you do not need to repeat 'visit'.
I can't believe my mom is going to visit me. I moved here seven years ago and my mother has not been here yet.
-OR-
I can't believe my mom is planning to visit me. I moved here seven years ago and not once has she been here.
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Technically, it's probably redundant, since "been here" seems to cover it. But I don't think it's offensively redundant. It would be better to find another way to say it. (has not yet come to see me.) ?? If you really want to avoid repetition, you could replace "my mother" with "she."

You could argue that she may have been "here" (not very specific) but not to visit.

The problem I have is with the tenses. You obviously mean, "is going to visit," since she can't be visiting if she's never come. I know, native speakers often say, "Guess what! My mother is visiting next week!" I'm not sure what a guru would say. I hope one comes by.

Best wishes, - A.
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Sorry Amy, I got called away in the middle of my post. Best wishes, - A.
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Hi Yankee, from your explanation, it sounds like if my mother has already arrived, the rest of the statement don't match that well. My question is, why is that so?