To wax heavy?

3 replies
Hello, can you tell me what does this mean?
"That is because they are not real, let alone 'more real than reality.' And yes, Mickey is an inauthentic mouse. One expects Europeans to wax heavy about that. But one expects a bit more sense from American historians."
Thanks!
Junior Member57
As far as I know, the verb "to wax" in this sense has very little, or nothing, to do with the noun "wax."

Here, "waxing" and "waning" are opposites, where "waxing" is increasing, and "waning" is decreasing.

It would be helpful to know the antecedent of your first "that."

IN this case, "to wax heavy" probably means to make a lot of noise about it - as opposed to "making light of it." (taking it very seriously - making "heavy" pronouncements about it) Emotion: big smile

"To wax eloquent" is a very common phrase, which means to become increasingly more eloquent.

When the moon is progressing in its phases from "new" toward "full," we say that it's waxing.
When it's in the process of receding from full, we say it's waning.
Veteran Member20,915
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.Trusted Users: Trusted users are allowed to use additional capabilities of the site such as private messaging to all users and various other advanced features. You cannot join this role unless you are promoted by an administrator.
Hi, I think you're right, but just in case I'm posting here a bit more of the article I'm talking about:
Look. It is one thing for snobbish European intellectuals to take American trivia seriously. Disneyana is the favorite mirror of America -- succeeding Luigi Barzini's insufficiently satiric suggestion of baseball -- for every European thinker from Umberto Eco on down. It was Eco who in his 1975 essay "Travels in Hyperreality" gave a deep and dark and ironic account of Pirates of the Caribbean as "more real than reality." Heavy implications followed.

I do not know if Michael Crichton reads Eco, but he had the perfect riposte in Jurassic Park, when its creator dismisses the marauding dinosaurs and general chaos with "When they opened Disneyland, nothing worked." To which the wise-guy mathematician responds, "But when the Pirates of the Caribbean breaks down, the pirates don't eat the tourists."

That is because they are not real, let alone "more real than reality." And yes, Mickey is an inauthentic mouse. One expects Europeans to wax heavy about that. But one expects a bit more sense from American historians.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,980871,00.html#ixzz1GtACXxXE
Looking for ESL work?: Try our EFL / TOEFL / ESL Jobs Section!
LOL! The pirates don't eat the tourists because they're made of wax! Emotion: shake

Yes, the article talks about degrees of reality, but I don't think this is what it means! Emotion: big smile

It was Eco who in his 1975 essay "Travels in Hyperreality" gave a deep and dark and ironic account of Pirates of the Caribbean as "more real than reality." Heavy implications followed.
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.Trusted Users: Trusted users are allowed to use additional capabilities of the site such as private messaging to all users and various other advanced features. You cannot join this role unless you are promoted by an administrator.