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Hi,

I sometimes have trouble correctly putting the phrases like "to which" after a noun. Could you help?

... how to handle titles when referring to them in writings other than the works to which the titles belong.

I feel I could replace "to which" with "where" like this and the it is be fine. What do you think?

...how to handle titles when referrign to them in writings other than the works where which the titles belong.

Should I make like this by putting the preposition at the end?

... how to handle titles when referring to them in writings other than the works which the titles belong to.

Using phrases like "in which", "to which", and "by which" and distinguishing situations where the word "where" can be used as well is difficult for me. Can you help?
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To which, in which etc.consist of a preposition and a relative pronoun. The preposition is usually determined by a verb, noun or adjective. In informal style the preposition is often placed at the end of the relative clause. Examples:
This is the house in which he lives. This is the house [which/that] he lives in.

The preposition is in because that preposition is used with house in this context and meaning: He lives in this house.
I bought the book about which you told me yesterday. I bought the book [which/that] you told me about yesterday.
The preposition is about because that preposition is used when we tell somebody about something: He told me about his problems.
Where is sometimes possible instead of to which or in which, especially when the intended meaning is that the place of something is mentioned:
Take this kettle to the kitchen where it belongs.

But: Ages ago, this island was occupied by Great Britain, to which it belongs even now / which it belongs to even now.
Note that there is a comma in the last sentence. A comma is needed for a certain type of relative clauses. Use the Search box to find out more about them.
CB
Comments  
Thank you.

You wrote:

Where is sometimes possible instead of to which or in which, especially when the intended meaning is that the place of something is mentioned:

Take this kettle to the kitchen where it belongs.

But: Ages ago, this island was occupied by Great Britain, to which it belongs even now / which it belongs to even now.

I don't fully understand why the bottom one in the above sentences of yours has to be 'to which' for two places eventhough one has its preposition after not right after (if that is what has to be used). I have trouble identifyng situations where 'where' and 'to which' or 'in which' can be used and when either should be used but not sort of interchangeably. Can you help me to better idenfity those situations?