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Hello, everyone!!

As far as I understand, in informal style we often use ‘where’ to introduce defining relative clauses instead of ‘at/on/in which’ only. However, I’m a little confused to have found following two contradictory answers about the usage; “to which vs. where”.

1. “The shop where he went” is OK, or you can retain the unnecessary preposition and leave off the relative pronoun: “the shop he went to”. But “the shop where he went to” is too much. – American English, retired professor (linguist)

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/503355/to-which-where


2. [Q] It's the shop ............. . [according to the meaning in 'I went in the shop yesterday.']
I wonder whether the following three made up by me are all ok?;
A. that I went to yesterday.
B. to which I went yesterday.
C. where I went yesterday.
= =
[A]
A. is ok
B. is ok, but quite formal.
C. is incorrect, but I think people do say this occasionally.

You can also hear: D. which I went to yesterday / British
https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/to-which-where.1147530 /

While I’m inclined to above #2, would anyone kindly clarify this grammatical usage?

Thanking for your usual helps and RGDS

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deepcosmosC. is incorrect, but I think people do say this occasionally.

In BrE, at least, it would be quite common for people to say things like "the shop where I went yesterday", and many would probably see this pattern as perfectly OK. To me, it is OK in everyday use, but wouldn't be ideal for formal writing. To say that it is incorrect feels too strong to me.

Comments  
GPY
deepcosmosC. is incorrect, but I think people do say this occasionally.

In BrE, at least, it would be quite common for people to say things like "the shop where I went yesterday", and many would probably see this pattern as perfectly OK. To me, it is OK in everyday use, but wouldn't be ideal for formal writing. To say that it is incorrect feels too strong to me.

Hi, GPY, thank you for the prompt reply. While you don't consider the 'C' incorrect, I would like to invite various opinions, since natives' replies so far for the same inquiries differs much viewing followings;

[Q] 1) A room to which I could move.

2) A room where I could move to.

3) A room where I could move.

- - -

[A] As a phrase, 1 is correct. Also: 'A room I could move to'. / British

https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/threads/200927-to-which-where


2. Sometimes it can. But to which cannot always be replaced by where. For example, the churches to which Paul wrote is not the same as the churches where Paul wrote. / British

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/503355/to-which-where


3. 'Where' can replace: AT WHICH, ON WHICH, IN WHICH after exact address or residence; floor, street, location, geographical place, city, area, state, country.

http://www.grammar-quizzes.com/clauses-4.html


Best RGDS,