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Please advise if it is nature to say: 'Today is sunny.'

Regards
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>if it is nature
natural
It's a little natural, but you will hear "Today IT is sunny" more more often

Yesterday it rained all day, but today it is sunny.

But I can imagine situations when you would say only "Today is sunny."
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LcwangPlease advise if it is nature to say: 'Today is sunny.'

Regards

We say: "It is sunny today". Always say "It is".

* It is sunny today

* It is raining today

* It is snowing today

* It is cold today

* It is hot today

* It is windy today

* It is mild today

* It is freezing today
This could be an American/British thing, but like I said, I can imagine situations where "Today is sunny" works. While "Today it is sunny" is far more common, as I said, I would NOT say you should ALWAYS use "it is," at least in American conversation.
Grammar GeekIt's a little natural, but you will hear "Today IT is sunny" more more often

Yesterday it rained all day, but today it is sunny.

But I can imagine situations when you would say only "Today is sunny."
I agree but I have an interesting point:
If I'm not mistaken, native speakers say It's the 27th November or Today is 27th November but I don't seem to hear Today IT is 27th November. Why is that so? Perhaps I ammistaken, after all. Emotion: smile

P.S. I know I use the British order, i.e. day - month.
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Grammar Geek
It's a little natural, but you will hear "Today IT is sunny" more more often

Yesterday it rained all day, but today it is sunny.

But I can imagine situations when you would say only "Today is sunny."

I agree but I have an interesting point:

If I'm not mistaken, native speakers say It's the 27th November or Today is 27th November but I don't seem to hear Today IT is 27th November. Why is that so? Perhaps I ammistaken, after all. Emotion: smile

P.S. I know I use the British order, i.e. day - month.

In the UK we are more likely to say "It rained all day yesterday, but it is sunny today".

I am not sure if there is a reason why we say "It's the 27th November" (in the UK we would say "It's the 27th of November"). I think it's just the way we structure our sentences and - in most cases - we would not include 'today', we would just say "It's the 27th of November".

TidusIn the UK we are more likely to say "It rained all day yesterday, but it is sunny today".

I am not sure if there is a reason why we say "It's the 27th November" (in the UK we would say "It's the 27th of November"). I think it's just the way we structure our sentences and - in most cases - we would not include 'today', we would just say "It's the 27th of November".
Thanks for the answer.

Comments:

in the UK we would say "It's the 27th ofNovember" - but you don't write the "of" and "the", do you? Emotion: wink

How often do you hear "Today is (the) 27th (of) November" in the UK, if at all? (Note that there's no "it" in that sentence)
Well done! We write "27th November". We say "27th of November", or "It's the 27th of November".

In terms of how often do I hear "Today is (the) 27th (of) November".... never. We don't tend to put 'today' at the front of a statement like that, if at all. We might say "yesterday was the 26th of November", or "It's the 28th of November tomorrow", but if we are talking about today, we'd just say "it's the 27th of November". If we did include the word 'today' it would be at the end: "It's the 27th of November today". We never say "Today is the 27th of November".
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