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I posted the following question long time ago. The thread has been locked but I am still confused about it.

The comptroller (A) wanted (B) to know if you (C) checked over the report he (D) left on your desk.

The given answer is (D) is incorrect, so I think it should be had left.

What have been confusing are:

  1. The above occurrences should be in the sequence of:
    First: to leave the report on the desk
    Second: to check over the report
    Third: to want to know
    Therefore, I wondered if I can change "checked over" to "had checked over" because this action happened before the comptroller wanted to know.
  2. If I can't change that, how about shorten the sentence to:
    The comptroller (A) wanted (B) to know if you (C) checked over the report.
    Can I use had checked over now?


  3. Please kindly advise on these.

    LCChang
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Hello LC

1. The comptroller (A) wanted (B) to know if you (C) had checked over the report he (D) left on your desk.

D ("the report he left") sounds fine to me.

The sentence reports:

2. "Have you checked over the report I left on your desk?"

The past perfect in #1 relates not to the sequence of events, but to the reporting of the present perfect.

MrP
Comments  
The comptroller (A) wanted (B) to know if you (C) had checked over the report he (D) left on your desk

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
InchoateknowledgeThe comptroller (A) wanted (B) to know if you (C) had checked over the report he (D) left on your desk



Thank you. Any advice on (D)?

LCChang
 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.