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I'd be happy if someone would answer my question. Thanks in advance.

Concerning the following 3 sentences---

A: Tom is as young as Jim.

B: Tom is not as young as Jim.

C: Tom is less young than Jim.

I know A implies that both Tom and Jim are young. But how about B and C? Are Tom and Jim in B both young? And how about C? I'd be happy if I was given any explanation.
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AnonymousI'd be happy if someone would answer my question. Thanks in advance.

Concerning the following 3 sentences---

A: Tom is as young as Jim. Fine.

B: Tom is not as young as Jim. Fine.

C: Tom is less young than Jim. Not so fine.

I know A implies that both Tom and Jim are young. But how about B and C? Are Tom and Jim in B both young? And how about C? I'd be happy if I was given any explanation.

I would say that Tom is older than Jim. I don't think that would necessarily make either of them old.
You know, like... 30 or something Emotion: smile
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Or, Jim is younger than Tom. Like if they're both...over 50 or something Emotion: big smile
--Hi, Philip. You judged "Tom is less young than Jim." Not so fine,

So how about "Jim is less old than Tom."? Is this sentence also not so fine?
It's the use of 'less' regarding age that is the problem.

You should use 'not as old as' or 'not as young as'.
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--Hi, I see well. But how about regarding size or weight or width?
Shouldn't we use "less" in saying or writing about these?
Use "not as" for that too.

K2 is not as tall as Mt. Everest. This refrigerator is not as wide as the other model and may fit in your kitchen better.
Hi,
what's wrong with "less tall" and similar stuff? Ok, "not as [...] as" is probably better in most cases, but can you say "less tall", "less old", etc, are odd? I think people say that... Emotion: smile
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