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Comparing the following two sentences, where A and B are two different time periods:

S1: A and B are extended to a period of 60 days and 90 days, respectively.

S2: A and B are each extended to a period of 60 days and 90 days, respectively.

Question: In S2, does the word "each" provide more emphasis to the tone(does it sound right/obvious) when "respectively" already denotes the subjects clearly? Or is it redundant, or even grammatically incorrect? Here is S3 for comparison:

S3: Each of A and B is extended to a period of 60 days and 90 days, repectively.
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Hi,

Welcome to the Forum.

Comparing the following two sentences, where A and B are two different time periods:

S1: A and B are extended to a period of 60 days and 90 days, respectively.

S2: A and B are each extended to a period of 60 days and 90 days, respectively.

Question: In S2, does the word "each" provide more emphasis to the tone(does it sound right/obvious) when "respectively" already denotes the subjects clearly? Or is it redundant, or even grammatically incorrect? Here is S3 for comparison:

S3: Each of A and B is extended to a period of 60 days and 90 days, repectively.

Don't use 'each' with 'respectively'.

Best wishes, Clive
Infinik... two sentences, where A and B are two different time periods:

I'm actually translating legal documents, wherein the sentences need to be concise and pinpointed accurate. So I want to know whether "each" is needed or not...
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Clive
Don't use 'each' with 'respectively'.

Thanks, Clive. Would you then suggest under this condition that "each" is prefered than "repectively", specifically, S4 below sounds better than S1?

S4: A and B are each extended to a period of 60 days and 90 days.
No, because when you use 'each' it means that A is extended to both 60 and 90 days, and B is extended to both 60 and 90 days - an impossibility.

Respectively is the correct word for this context as it means A becomes 60 days and B becomes 90 days.
Nona The BritNo, because when you use 'each' it means that A is extended to both 60 and 90 days, and B is extended to both 60 and 90 days - an impossibility.

Gotcha!
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Your posts are not clear in terms of what do you really want to say.

It's not clear if you want to say:

- extend A to 60 days
and (at the same time)
- extend B to 90 days

or:

- extend both A and B to 60 days or 90 days

This is a legal messEmotion: sad