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Hi, everybody!

Following is from Toni Morrison's 'Song of Solomon'.

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But there were properties nobody wanted yet, or little edges of property somebody didn't want Jews to have, or Catholics to have, or properties nobody knew were of any value yet.

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I am not sure how to undestand "properties nobody knew were of any value yet."

Is it, (A) "properties, nobody knew, were of any value yet."........

or, (B) "properties which nobody knew (that they) were of any value yet."

Between A and B, which is correct understanding?

Or can there be another explanation to this difficult sentence?
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B is quite good
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There's nothing wrong there.

In the structure

*properties that nobody knew that they were of any value yet

the first that is optional1, and the that they must be deleted, thus yielding:

properties (that) nobody knew were of any value yet.

See Subject? and, especially, Using words I'm sure (that) (they) don't even exist..

CJ

1optional in spite of its being the subject of the relative clause that were of any value yet.
If it weren't for the intervening nobody knew, you could not omit the first that.

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Comments  
Thanks, Marius!

Then, it should be considered as a wrong sentence, omitting without on solid grammatical rules?
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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AnonymousThanks, Marius!

Then, it should be considered as a wrong sentence, omitting without on solid grammatical rules?

Who said anything about the original being wrong?