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Hi,

It gets really difficult for me to use "too" sometimes. Like, i tend to use the below sentences interchangeably and get embarrassed then,

1. Are you from Canada too?

2. Are you too from Canada?

I know they mean quite different according to where this "too" is placed. But when referred to a dictionary it says "too" does mean also,in addition, as well. Then again, I've heard some people who have English as their first language using sentences like these ,

3. " Do you like her too?"

when they should say,

4. "Do you too like her?"

Is this because this adverb can be used at the end of a clause? Is this why the sentences 1 and 3 are correct? Or are they wrong? Please explain. Am too confused.
Comments  
Too means "also".

Are you from Canada, also?

2. Are you also from Canada?

If using too is too much (excessive) for you, then substitute "also."Emotion: big smile
Are you from Canada too? is the more idiomatic of the two.
It means the same as Are you too from Canada?
That is, it means Are you, in addition to the other person who is from Canada, also from Canada?
By practical logic, it does not mean Are you from Canada as well as being from elsewhere?

In contrast the sentences about liking someone have two different meanings.

Do you like her too? is ambiguous. It's meaning depends on context.
It can mean In addition to liking someone else, do you like her?
It can also mean In addition to other people liking her, do you like her?

Do you too like her? is not ambiguous. It can only mean the second of the two: In addition to other people liking her, do you like her?

CJ
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CalifJimAre you from Canada too? is the more idiomatic of the two.
It means the same as Are you too from Canada?
In contrast the sentences about liking someone have two different meanings.

Do you like her too? is ambiguous.
CJ

So, how do I recognize such type of usage? I mean how should I know which one of the two forms is to be used under different contexts.Are there some rules?
There aren't any rules as such.

In most cases you can just stress the word that goes with too and put too at the end.

Thus, the following have different meanings. It's done with the voice.

Do you like her too? (You as well as others.)
Do you like her too?
(Her as well as others.)

CJ
CalifJimThere aren't any rules as such.

In most cases you can just stress the word that goes with too and put too at the end.

Thus, the following have different meanings. It's done with the voice.

Do you like her too? (You as well as others.)
Do you like her too?
(Her as well as others.)

CJ

What about the written form? Won't it be ambiguous then?
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My love, my love! Don't worry. As CJ pointed out before, context will decide it. Emotion: smile
I see. Thanks, CJ. Thanks, Doll.Emotion: smile