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In classes 6 and 7 a bi-lingual dictionary, and in class 8 a mono-lingual dictionary may be much too beneficial to the study of the students.

Is the sentence, especially the underlined part, correct?
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I don't think that's what you want to say. Something that is "too something" is NOT a good thing.

  • The box is TOO HEAVY to lift - it weight so much that I cannot lift it.

  • She is TOO YOUNG to travel by herself. To be young is fine, but she is so young that she cannot go by herself

  • She is TOO THIN to be healthy. Thin may be good, but if you are so thin that it's not healthy, you are too thin.
So if you say "too benefiicial" it means it is SO good for them that it's bad. This isn't very logical.

May be very beneficial?
DiamondrgIn classes 6 and 7 a bi-lingual dictionary, and in class 8 a mono-lingual dictionary may be much too beneficial to the study of the students.

Is the sentence, especially the underlined part, correct?
More would make sense, given the context.
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Thank you very much.
DiamondrgThank you very much.
Bir şey değil
Someone told me that he had heard "Thank you too much" in a movie.

What does it mean if it is actually used?

and if that sentence is correct, can we strech it a bit by saying:

"Thank you very too much" as one of the forum members suggested saying we could say:

"I've had much too much to eat" I have eaten such an amount that I really might burst!

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/TooMuchVsMuchToo/bbbzj/Post.htm
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It was probably 'thank you so much'. Thank you too much is not correct (although perhaps it was said as a joke?).

Thank you very too much - no you can't say this. Nor can you say 'thank you very so much' but you can say 'thank you so very much'. don't ask me why.

much too much - yes this is used, usually a little bit comically.
Wow! That was pretty quick NOna!

Since we are still talking about "too" and its negative connotation, what do you think of this:

1- The exam was very difficult. I did very badly on it.

2. The exam was too difficult. I did very badly on it.

If both are correct, what nuances of meaning could be deduced or perceived by the native speaker?

In Petty Azar's English Basic Grammar:

"Very" will always have a postive result.

"Too" will always have a negative result.

Thus, If Ms. Azar were to write my examples, she would say:

1- The exam was very difficult. I did pass though.

2- The exam was too difficult. I couldn't pass.

So you probably now know why I asked if we can use "very" with a negative result.

Thank you too much (jokingly)!
Wow, I can't imagine why someone would say that "very" would always have a positive result. It's just not true.

He is very sick. He may not live.

That water is very hot. She got burned.

That exam was very difficult. I didn't pass.
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