+0
A: John's grades are good. B: Mary's grades are not bad, ___.

Which word should I use to fill in the blank, too or either?
1 2 3
Comments  (Page 2) 
CalifJimThe rule about too and either, however, does not operate according to semantic content, but is purely a matter of syntax.
The rule about too and either sometimes operates according to semantic content.

I am not a student. Is he not a student, either?

I am a teacher. Isn't he a teacher, too?
The rule about too and either sometimes operates according to semantic content.

I am not a student. Is he not a student, either?

I am a teacher. Isn't he a teacher, too?

Until now, our examples have all been statements, not questions. But the too/either part is still responding to the FIRST statement, and should look at whether it has a negation in it. In the first one, there is a NOT so it gets the EITHER.

In the second example, the first statement is stated in teh positive (no "NOT") and so because the too/either sentence is agreeing with that original sentence, so it still takes the too.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I am not a student. Is he not a student, either?
I am a teacher. Isn't he a teacher, too?

Good catch, Teo!
The "rule" applies to statements.
When you use these question formulas, similar to "tag questions", then the "rule" flips to the opposite choices.

I am a teacher. He is a teacher, too, isn't he? (Isn't he a teacher too?)
I am not a student. He is not a student, either, is he? (Is he not a student, either?)

It's easiest to see in the second example you cite. The second is asking "Isn't it the case that [he too is a teacher]?", the negation being outside the clause that needs the "too". But because we need to paraphrase this to show the pattern, perhaps you're right that there is sometimes a semantic element involved in our choices.

CJ
when sb says "I love cookies" we can reply "me too" and "I dont love cookies" we can say "me neither" as a reply. What if somebody says " I love cookies" and if the reply is about a third person singular like he or she, whats goona be the answer? Except for "my brother too" or "my sister either"
for example:
A: I love cookies
B: her too (Is this answer appropriate?)
or A: I dont love cookies
B: Him neither
me too and me neither are short forms of I do too or I am too and I don't either or I'm not either.
The short forms are not usually used for other persons, so the most typical responses are
-- I love cookies.
-- She does too.
-- I don't like cookies.
-- He doesn't either.
The short forms are understandable, but I don't hear them used.
CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
in the first sentence you are also saying that the grades are not bad, for this reason in the second sentence you should use either
either
An interesting thread. Emotion: smile
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
hey thanks Emotion: big smile ur post helps me a lot Emotion: big smile
Show more