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Hi,

Could you please check the text for me? Are there any grammar mistakes or wrong words?

Gaieff is the brother of Madame Ranevskaya. He does not have a certain profession and apparently he is scorning the success of Lophakin. The two do not like each other very much. Although he has an aristoctaric background and Lophakhin has a poor, serfdom background , now Lophakhin is far more successful than him. Gaieff is very talkative and sometimes this embarrasses him and strangely when he is embarrassed he is playing an imaginary biliard game to change the subject. He is sometimes snobbish but most of the time awkward. He shows that being a noble person does not mean being graceful.Surprisingly at the end of the play he accepts a position in(at?) a bank which is too much modest(?) for him. He separates himself (from the others?)by being a bit realist at the end of the play.

Thanks...
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Hi,

In my view it would be more natural and common to omit the word "certain" in this situation. (He does not have a profession)

aristocratic (spelling)

"has a poor, serfdom background" is a little unusual. Perhaps, "has the poor background of a serf," or "comes from a poor, serfdom background."

I would say, "far more successful than he," but perhaps that's old fashioned.

comma after "strangely"

he plays an imaginary billiard game

He is sometimes snobbish but more often he is awkward. ??

He shows that nobility does not make a person graceful. ??

a position at a bank which is much too modest for him.

At the end of the play, he sets himself apart by being a bit of a realist ??

Best regards, - A.
Comments  
Thank you so much Avangi for correcting me!
AvangiI would say, "far more successful than he," but perhaps that's old fashioned
John is rich but Chris is richer than him. Is it wrong,too?

Should it be " John is rich but Chris is richer than he/he is."

Avangia position at a bank which is much too modest for him.
Is "too much" wrong? I have never come across "much too" version of it.

Edit: I got it! "too much" is an adverb and when there is an adjective you should use "much too", right?
AvangiAt the end of the play, he sets himself apart by being a bit of a realist ??
Yes, that is what I want to say. If the word "realist" was "realistic", would it be possible to say " by being a bit realistic".

The last question, what is the difference between "more often" and "most of the time"?

Most of the time he sounds like he has a mouth full of toilet paper. (from google). Can I use "more often" in this sentence?

Best wishes,