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Hi,

When you have a sentential construct like 'too much of something' or 'so much of something', does it always have be that 'something' has to be an uncountable noun? Can it ever be a countable noun?

too much of money -- good, I think.

too much of 'countable noun'??
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Use 'of' preposition only when a noun has a determinative word.

Ex.:

Too much money may spoil you.
Too much of that money has spoilt you.

As to countable nouns, you should use 'many' with them.

Ex.:

Too many people attended the meeting.
So many of those admirable people attended the meeting.


Hope this helps.

Cheers!
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Hi,
maybe you are interested in this structure:
I think our teacher is too much of a <insert countable insult here>
She's more of a monster than a real person.
She's not much of a teacher, you know, she's more of a <insert countable insult here>

Sorry for the countable insults, but I can't think of other examples using this kind of structure... Emotion: smile