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Have a good day you all!

I knew the forms: a) VERY precious, b) TOO precious, c) I love you TOO MUCH.

But recently I read this sentence: "Our holidays are MUCH TOO precious to spend them apart".

I'd say, on the contrary: "Our holidays are REALLY TOO precious..."

Why MUCH TOO, seeing that also TOO MUCH would be wrong here, in my opinion?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Thanks Maple Tree Emotion: smile
she is much too beautiful to date.

i am strong too much

are these right?
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U'r welcome, Magic79Emotion: smile

By discussing, we can detect the mistakes of our using the language, thus can benefit from it.
Saltukhanshe is much too beautiful to date. (This doesn't make much sense Emotion: indifferent

i am strong too much (sounds weird. Emotion: indifferent Why not simply "I'm very strong" ?

Magic79What about the following:

a. The box is too heavy to lift (correct).

b. The box is much too heavy to lift (doesn't sound right...whcha think?)

a. The box is too heavy to lift (correct in a general sense)

b. The box is much too heavy to lift by your self (much too- is used to describe a contrast condition).

This apartment is much too small for 4 of us to share.

He was driving much too fast to negotiate this curve. As a result, he went of the road.
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she She is much too beautiful to date.
i I am too strong too much
With the corrections indicated these are grammatically correct; however, they don't make sense. They mean:

She is so beautiful that no one [can / should] date her.
I am excessively strong. I am more strong than I should be.


CJ
he is too much talkative. Is this correct??
AnonymousHe is too much talkative.
We use only too and an adjective (talkative), never too much and an adjective.

Use too much with an uncountable noun: too much coffee, too much sugar

CJ
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he is too much talkative. Is this correct?

No. But we often say much too + adjective.
eg He is much too talkative.
Here, 'much' intensifies 'too'.