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Have a good day you all!

I knew the forms: a) VERY precious, b) TOO precious, c) I love you TOO MUCH.

But recently I read this sentence: "Our holidays are MUCH TOO precious to spend them apart".

I'd say, on the contrary: "Our holidays are REALLY TOO precious..."

Why MUCH TOO, seeing that also TOO MUCH would be wrong here, in my opinion?
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Hello!

You need an adjective after "much too"
It's much too expensive!
This is much too heavy for you.

"too much" is an adverb
It's raining too much to go for a walk
I've been working too much
Perfect!

But now I have unresolved the other part of my question: a) why "much too" + adjective and not simply "too" + adjective? What's the difference? b) In that context in my opinion it would be allowed adverbs only, such as "really" ("really too precious") or so, not adjectives ("much too precious") at all.

What do you think about that?

Thanks for your patience.
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a)" Much too ...."

It is an extra emphasis. It implies that the holiday is not only precious, but very precious indeed.

"Really too ..." again, 'really' is used here as an emphasis.

So you could use either.

b) I don't really understand your assertion that only adverbs should be used. Surely, you are being much too prescriptive? Emotion: smile
Thanks Abbie.
I think the logical (not just grammar) structure of the sentence requires an adverb/conjunction to add emphasis to an adjective. I never would say "I'm much tired" but I'd say "I'm very tired" or, (worse for my health!!!...) "I'm too tired" or, even more, "really (an adverb) too tired". Precisely for this reason (because "much tired" is not correct) I don't understand why may be acceptable "much too tired".

Am I too logical, perhaps much too logical?....
"Too" is an adverb of degree; these are used to describe the intensity or degree of an action, an adjective or another adverb.

In "much too," the 'much' is acting as an intensifier to the adverb 'too.'

An 'intensifier ' is a word - particularly an adverb or adjective - which is used to emphasise another adjective, verb or adverb.

"I'm too tired" - 'I'm feeling pretty tired'

"I'm much too tired" I'm completely exhausted, and I want you to understand that I am very very tired indeed.

"That coat is too big for her" - She could really have a size smaller.

"That coat is much too big for her" - The coat is so big it's hanging off her and she looks ridiculous!

Just to make things a little more complicate for you, we also say "much too much" - meaning a far larger amount than is needed or wanted.

"I've had much too much to eat" I have eaten such an amount that I really might burst! Emotion: smile

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What about the following:

a. The box is too heavy to lift (correct).

b. The box is much too heavy to lift (doesn't sound right...whcha think?)
Magic79What about the following:

a. The box is too heavy to lift (correct).

b. The box is much too heavy to lift (doesn't sound right...whcha think?)

Both sound ok.

As abbie1948 has pointed out:

In "much too," the 'much' is acting as an intensifier to the adverb 'too.'

Nothing wrong with your sentence b.
Just an added comment:

In my opinion, the word 'really' does not actually intensify 'too tired' in a sentence such as "I'm really too tired to do that".
Instead, the word 'really' means "The truth is that I am too tired to do that".
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