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Hello, dear everyone.

My students do some sports in clubs, so they often mention that they've got 'a training' today ('a training of basketball', 'a tennis training'). It sounds a bit strange for me because I've met the word 'work-out' in real speech - while 'training' is usually associated with global process or strategy of skill development ('computer training is sufficient for your success' - not 'daily computer TRAININGS').

I understand that it is probably just my personal impression. Will you please give me a clue which uses of the word ‘training’ are proper in everyday neutral speech.

Thank you for your kind and instructive assistance.
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Hi,

Welcome to the Forum.

'Training' refers to 'practicing in order to acquire a skill'. eg You can train to run a mile in 4 minutes, to drive a bus, to use a particular piece of computer software.

'Training' is not countable, so it's not correct to say 'I have a training today'. Say 'I have a tennis training session today', or 'I have some basketball training today'.

The word 'work-out' refers to physical exercise and sports training, so that's also OK, and it would be more commonly used, I think. However, it is slightly informal.

Best wishes, Clive
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Training has a purpose - to improve at something.

A 'work-out' is just a general excercise session. I'd only connect 'work-out' with being in a gym, not in practicing a specific sport.
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Comments  
Bravo clive, that is the great explaination, I've ever heard. Then i look them up in my english english dictionary. Everything you said is completely true but nowadays youngters prefer use training to work-out. I dont know why, maybe it is more formal than work-out. Anyway both of them are good in this case.
Thank you very much!

I only can repeat that these are the most brilliant explanations. Now I'm aware of use as well as tendency!

( Emotion: smile It's not so often you get clear explanaion via the Internet.)
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 nona the brit's reply was promoted to an answer.
Hi,

Perhaps there's a difference, then, between BrE and AmE as regards 'workout'.

Here in Canada, I did a swimming work-out yesterday to improve my swimming. Emotion: smile

Best wishes, Clive