+1
These days all trains are crowded.
1 2
Comments  
Anonymous These days all trains are crowded.
What's your answer?

CJ
Anonymous These days all trains are crowded.
You need to use the word "not" to transform the sentence from the positive into the negative one. Try to put "not" in the right order in the sentence. You can do it using two contraction forms or the verb and "not" as two words.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
These days, not any train will be uncrowded.
These days, not all trains are crowded.
AnonymousThese days all trains are crowded.
It seems that many were eager to reply rather than wait for your solution.

You have a choice of two kinds of negation with this example.

Total negation: These days none of the trains are crowded. (You can't find any crowded train at all.)
Partial negation: These days not all trains are crowded. (Some trains may be crowded; some, not.)

CJ
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Or
These days no trains are crowded.

Clive
But we have to change sentence without changing the meaning.
CalifJimTotal negation: These days none of the trains are crowded. (You can't find any crowded train at all.)Partial negation: These days not all trains are crowded. (Some trains may be crowded; some, not.)
these two sentence does not mean 'These days all trains are crowded.'
CalifJimThese days all trains are crowded.
Whereas negative sentence which I posted 'These days, not any train will be uncrowded' means 'These days all trains are crowded.'

While we make negative or affirmative the meaning of the original sentence should not be changed.
sandy sandyjrBut we have to change sentence without changing the meaning. ... While we make negative or affirmative the meaning of the original sentence should not be changed.
Where does it say that anywhere in the original post of this thread? It seems to me that you just made up that condition. The thread title says "affirmative to negative". It should be obvious that such a change is not possible without changing the meaning.

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more