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Hello,
Is 'transition' a verb in this quoatation? Is 'transition' used as a verb at all? I thought it is only a noun. It seems to me here acting as a verb though. Could anyone explain it to me, please? Shouldn't it be transfer here? Thanks in advance.

"I have given it my all sir, and I have given you my all sir, and i will continue to do so as we transition to a new press secretary."
(Source: www.cnn.com)
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Hello,
Is 'transition' a verb in this quoatation? Is 'transition' used as a verb at all?


Yes. It's not used that much as a verb though. The noun is far more common, and note that it is an intransitive verb. Here it is used with the meaning of: 'make a transition'.

Hope this helps,

- YoHf

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"To transition" is peculiarly appropriate, in the context of a press officer.

They do strange things with nouns.

MrP
AnonymousHello,
Is 'transition' a verb in this quoatation? Is 'transition' used as a verb at all? I thought it is only a noun. It seems to me here acting as a verb though. Could anyone explain it to me, please? Shouldn't it be transfer here? Thanks in advance.

"I have given it my all sir, and I have given you my all sir, and i will continue to do so as we transition to a new press secretary."
(Source: www.cnn.com)

As Mr P says, it is an intransitive very and seldom used. I would advise using the expression "make a transition" or finding another verb.
The verb for "transition" (n) is "to transit" (move or change); Transition is a noun!

Hence:

(noun with the verb "to make")

I have given it my all, sir......... as we make the transition to a new press secretary.

(with the verb "to transit")

I have given it my all, sir.........as we transit to a new press secretary.

Me: Still sounds strange. The first application is best. It's one of those verbs we all love to hate....like " to strew".....because, I guess, we are so used to rew being a past tense verb form...drew....threw.... blew....etc.

I mean...after all, would you say " as we illumination the room"? No....we illuminate the room

Hey! Maybe the real verb could be "transitate"!! ...as we transitate to the new press secretary. ........ Sounds even better than transit...don't ya think!??
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I found "transition" as an intransitive verb in a couple of the online dictionaries I consulted. It's first usage in this manner, from what I read, was 1946. I still think that it is very lame to use this word as a verb, when the word "change" can be easily used instead. I think some people use it because they think that using multiple syllables makes them appear clever. It just grates on me, like fingernails running over a chalkboard. I am not surprised to find "transition" used as a verb in business writing. Here's where the allergy to simple one-syllable words seems to be pandemic.
It's one of those words that's used incorrectly in business. And because those incorrect uses tend to be in meetings, they behave almost like viruses, with more and more people adopting the incorrect use.

As Sharper quite rightly said, it's a noun. Not a verb.
Amen! But remove the apostrophe from "Its first usage . . .."
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Agree. But write, "It's one of those words that are used incorrectly in business."
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