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Hello,

I have some things I want to ask you...We generally learn that transitive verbs are those who take direct object (e.g.I hit him). My question is: gramatically, are these direct objects obligatory for a sentence to be correct? Because, if someone asks me What are you doing? I can simply answer I'm reading!, without any direct object expressed. How does grammar take I'm reading! from my example?

So, are direct objects obligatory after a transitive verb or they can be implicit as well (as in my example)? Is my example, in fact, a transitive verb?

Thanks

p.s. Some reference would be highly appreciated!

Emotion: smile
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Hello Esperanto, and welcome to English Forums. The answer is simple: a verb is transitive if it has a direct object and intransitive if it does not. So read is either, depending on whether is has a DO. See [url="http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/069.html "]HERE, FOR INSTANCE[/url].
Yes, but is I'm reading really intransitive (not having a DO expressed), or it is transitive with an implicit direct object [i'm reading (a book)]...?
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There is no such thing as an 'implicit' direct object. Please read the link I supplied.
<<It is generally assumed by syntacticians that some verbs are obligatorily transitive. An example of one that isn't is eat. It can be used either with a direct object (I've already eaten lunch) or without (I've already eaten). I don't mean in constructions where the object is required to be eliminated, like passives (The food wasn't all eaten) or relative clauses (the things that they eat); I mean that in construction types that allow the object to be present, if the verb is eatthe object can just be left implicit>>

Indeed there is.
Mister MicawberThere is no such thing as an 'implicit' direct object. Please read the link I supplied.
Mr. M., when I click on that link I get an online publisher, not a grammar discussion. Emotion: sad

Anonymous, what source are you quoting from??
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Esperantoif someone asks me What are you doing? I can simply answer I'm reading!, without any direct object expressed. How does grammar take I'm reading! from my example?
You are talking about a grammatical phenomenon called "absolute use".

"Absolute use" means omitting a direct object after a verb that is normally transitive, the object being easily inferred from the context. For example, eat is transitive. When you say "I'm eating" it means you are eating food, of course. food is the inferred object. While some analysts see this as an intransitive use of eat, it is not intransitive in the same sense as other verbs like sleep are intransitive.
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From Oxford's glossary of grammatical terms:

Absolute use: The use of a transitive verb without an expressed object, as in: I didn’t realize.

http://www.oxfordlanguagedictionaries.com/Public/PublicResources.html?direction=b-de-en&sp=S/oldo...

CJ
khoffMr. M., when I click on that link I get an online publisher, not a grammar discussion.
Lord, that was 5 years ago! I have no idea what I had hoped to link to. I'll look around and see if I can find another appropriate one.

Meanwhile, I have just discovered that there is an 'implicit DO'. That's good.
Oh, heck! I can't find what I'm looking for. I'm not even sure what I'm looking for. Read this thread, then:

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/TransitiveVsIntransitive/xcnnc/post.htm
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