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Hi

I tried to use my dictionaries to understand fully the difference between translate and translitrate, but couldn't. Could you please help me shedding some light on the difference between these two words?

Thanks a lot,

Tom
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Mr Tom,

the terms are used in translation studies, the latter meaning to render (a word, etc., in one alphabet) into corresponding letters of another alphabet. For example, the Greek word λογοσ can be transliterated as "logos"; in addition, many proper names are transliterated from one language to another, especially in official documentation. Translate means to express the sense of (words or text) in another language. The same word "logos" is translated as "knowledge" in English.

Respectfully, Gleb Chebrikoff
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Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks, GC.

...but when and why do we need tranlitration? And what use is it?

Tom
You are welcome, MrT!

There are cases, especially with proper names, when translation won't work. For the French, for instance, the etymology of the name Salt Lake City is no that important so as to translate it - La Ville Du Lac Salé. Therefore, they write 'Salt Lake City' and adust their pronunciation to these letter combinations. Another example: a girl named Hope in England would probably turn into Nadezhda in Russian, which she won't like a lot. One solution is for the Russians to say Хоуп, and, besides, write so in Hope's passport or visa. These are just few instances where transliteration offers substantial help.

Respectfully, Gleb Chebrikoff