Hi!


I want to know what you think about using translation to learn a foreign language. I've been learning English for almost ten years now and I personally never translate English words into Japanese which is my native language partly because the two languages are so different from each other that perfect translation is virtually impossible. But the most important reason for me to not translate is the fact that we do not translate inside our heads when we are communicating with our native languages. I don't translate Japanese words into any other language when I have a talk in Japanese. It's also the case for any native speakers of any languages, I believe.

I want thoughts from anybody who has ever learned any foreign language no matter what your native language might be. I think learning Spanish for a native speaker of English is not the same as learning Chinese for Spanish speaking people. Please let me know your experiences.



Regard

kook jreason for me to not translate

reason for me not to translate. See https://www.EnglishForward.com/English/ToNotNotTo/bjznxc/post.htm

kook jwhen I have a talk in Japanese.

when I have to talk in Japanese.

kook jpartly because the two languages are so different from each other that perfect translation is virtually impossible.

That happens in many cases, not just with English and Japanese.


I've learnt different languages to different extents and noticed that depending on what exactly needs to said, exact translations can be possible. When something common across cultures and nationalities is said, like a need to go shopping, it can be translated exactly. When something uncommon across cultures and nationalities is said, like a reference to custard https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Custard or cadet forces (informally, they are collectively known as cadet forces or cadets) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_Cadet_Forces , exact translation is not possible. Instead, they have to be mentioned and then explained. There are many other possible examples.

kook j

Hi!


I want to know what you think about using translation to learn a foreign language. I've been learning English for almost ten years now and I personally never translate English words into Japanese which is my native language partly because the two languages are so different from each other that perfect translation is virtually impossible. But the most important reason for me to not translate is the fact that we do not translate inside our heads when we are communicating with our native languages. I don't translate Japanese words into any other language when I have a talk in Japanese. It's also the case for any native speakers of any languages, I believe.

I want thoughts from anybody who has ever learned any foreign language no matter what your native language might be. I think learning Spanish for a native speaker of English is not the same as learning Chinese for Spanish speaking people. Please let me know your experiences.


Regard

Learning a foreign language by doing some "translations" sounds a good idea - you get a word in one language, and you find out its equivalent (or equivalents) in the other, plus some grammar rules. Keep doing this you will be able to accumulate a considerable volume of vocabulory and grammar proficiency. Not bad - actually this was a "classical way" of language learning - but of old school, popular in the past century.

What's the problem with this method - you will never be able to really "think" in this foreign language - you will first be thinking in your own native language and then convert it to the target. People found that this so-called "translation method" was not much of help if you wish to learn and be fluent in a foreign language. My native language is Chinese mandarin and I was study English. At the begining the translation method indeed helped me to build my basically vocabulary but at the later stage, I encountered big issue with speaking/listening the colloquial English...

The other way around this is the "second language acquisition". You acquisit the ability to use the 2nd language the way a kid learns to speak his/her mother tongue. Well, this is going to be a big topic I will have to open up a different pages to discuss about....

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
lingopracticer

Learning a foreign language by doing some "translations " sounds a good idea - you get a word in one language, and you find out its equivalent (or equivalents) in the other, plus some grammar rules. Keep doing this you will be able to accumulate a considerable volume of vocabulory and grammar proficiency. Not bad - actually this was a "classical way" of language learning - but of old school, popular in the past century.

What's the problem with this method - you will never be able to really "think" in this foreign language - you will first be thinking in your own native language and then convert it to the target. People found that this so-called "translation method" was not much of help if you wish to learn and be fluent in a foreign language. My native language is Chinese mandarin and I was study English. At the begining the translation method indeed helped me to build my basically vocabulary but at the later stage, I encountered big issue with speaking/listening the colloquial English...

The other way around this is the "second language acquisition". You acquisit the ability to use the 2nd language the way a kid learns to speak his/her mother tongue. Well, this is going to be a big topic I will have to open up a different pages to discuss about....

About the Second-Language Acquisition (SLA), Wikipedia elaborates in details:


A central theme in SLA research is that of interlanguage, the idea that the language that learners use is not simply the result of differences between the languages that they already know and the language that they are learning, but that it is a complete language system in its own right, with its own systematic rules. This interlanguage gradually develops as learners are exposed to the targeted language. The order in which learners acquire features of their new language stays remarkably constant, even for learners with different native languages, and regardless of whether they have had language instruction. However, languages that learners already know can have a significant influence on the process of learning a new one. This influence is known as language transfer.

The primary factor driving SLA appears to be the language input that learners receive. Learners become more advanced the longer they are immersed in the language they are learning, and the more time they spend doing free voluntary reading. The input hypothesis developed by linguist Stephen Krashen makes a distinction between language acquisition and language learning (acquisition–learning distinction), claiming that acquisition is a subconscious process, whereas learning is a conscious one. According to this hypothesis, the acquisition process in L2(Language 2) is the same as L1 (Language 1) acquisition. The learning process is consciously learning and inputting the language being learned. However, this goes as far as to state that input is all that is required for acquisition. Subsequent work, such as the interaction hypothesis and the comprehensible output hypothesis, has suggested that opportunities for output and for interaction may also be necessary for learners to reach more advanced levels.