If i say I was a Boston transplant, would that mean I am a new immigrant of the city from somewhere else or

does it mean that I come from Boston?

I checked out the dictionary already but still fail to figure out what it'd mean being put in such a sentence fragment.

THanks for answering in advance, anyone!
1 2
Hi,

Without any context, it's ambiguous.

It doesn't seem to me like a commonly said phrase.

Clive
chivalryBoston transplant
If I asked you where you were from (here in California), and you said you were a Boston transplant, I would easily understand it to mean that you used to live in Boston before moving here. It wouldn't make sense to me if you said you were a California transplant.

CJ
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CliveHi, Without any context, it's ambiguous. It doesn't seem to me like a commonly said phrase. Clive
The original context goes as something like this:

" I'm planning on taking the job as a photographer for the Discovery program this upcoming month, by then I will be following the impresario's footsteps, filming and translaing for her. She's a Boston native, and I'm a Boston transplant, too.

So if the stars are aligned, we will be visiting your place soon and I'm looking for a chance to hang!"

I don't think the context will help a lot if we don't know what that phrasal segment means in the first place, though.
You can easily figure out that it means "originally from Boston" from context - "She's a Boston native, and I'm a Boston transplant, too."
CSnyderYou can easily figure out that it means "originally from Boston" from context - "She's a Boston native, and I'm a Boston transplant, too."
No, that doesn't help me comprehend what the person tries to convey.

Because a transplant, according to the dictionary, is a person who transfer from one place or residence to another, how am I supposed to know if Boston is the place where he transfer from or to?
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chivalry
CSnyderYou can easily figure out that it means "originally from Boston" from context - "She's a Boston native, and I'm a Boston transplant, too."
No, that doesn't help me comprehend what the person tries to convey.
Because a transplant, according to the dictionary, is a person who transfer from one place or residence to another, how am I supposed to know if Boston is the place where he transfer from or to?
Just dissect the sentence:

"She's a Boston native" = She is originally from Boston

"and I'm a Boston transplant, too" = I am also originally from Boston

The function of the word "too" is to equate the meanings of the two phrases "Boston native" and "Boston transplant".

Why just not say I came from Boston?

People often like to speak in colorful ways.

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