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My mother tongue has a handful of idioms related to trenches and trench warfare. Do the examples below work in English as well?

1. Can I say this after I've returned to work from my holiday?

(I'm) back in the trenches.

2. When someone with no practical experience writes a highly theoretical essay about my job, can I say:

Well, he's never been in the trenches.

or

He doesn't know anything about the life in the trenches.

3. Let's say there's a man and woman, and their relationship is "mutilated" beyond hope of recovery, yet they are still staying together, living a life full of useless arguments, accusations, blame etc., can I describe this unhealthy state as "trench warfare"?

Or

A: I hear Dick and Jane are not on speaking terms.
B: Man, that's (complete) trench warfare, the thing between those two.


(trench warfare suggesting stalemate / state not likely to change in the near future)

Thanks in advance, as always.
Comments  
1. and 3. are used in British English, yes. 2 isn't.

I suspect these are not used in American English.
Nona The Brit1. and 3. are used in British English, yes. 2 isn't.

I suspect these are not used in American English.
On second thoughts, 2. would sound a bit odd (emphasis on "a bit") even in my mother tongue, though I do occasionally use it when trying to sound original. Emotion: wink

Not sure about Americans: they did fight in WW I, whereas my country didn't even exist before 1918.
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You know what? 2) is used in AmE:

Ford President Comes From 'The Trenches'

DETROIT Tom Brown writing for Reuters reported that Nick Scheele, Ford Motor Co.'s president and chief operating officer, sees himself as a soldier in Detroit's cut-throat car wars. "My whole career I've been in the trenches," Scheele... "My whole career I've been in the trenches," Scheele told a small group of journalists over dinner last week, as he ...

Public safety director from the trenches - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

... the detective bureau there, said the fact that Machesky "has been in the trenches" will help him be an effective manager ...

Marius HancuYou know what? 2) is used in AmE:

Ford President Comes From 'The Trenches'

DETROIT Tom Brown writing for Reuters reported that Nick Scheele, Ford Motor Co.'s president and chief operating officer, sees himself as a soldier in Detroit's cut-throat car wars. "My whole career I've been in the trenches," Scheele... "My whole career I've been in the trenches," Scheele told a small group of journalists over dinner last week, as he ...

Public safety director from the trenches - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

... the detective bureau there, said the fact that Machesky "has been in the trenches" will help him be an effective manager ...

Marius, you're right! I had the impression that I 've encountered it in an American book I own. I went and checked it out and found:

"He's been in the trenches" !!!

Hi - American here. They all sound fine to me.
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Grammar GeekHi - American here. They all sound fine to me.
Does the minidialogue as a whole sound natural at all, though? Emotion: wink
Actually, if you said it was trench warfare between them, I would think they were engaging in a non-literal form of close combat. I wouldn't think of the trenches on either side of the battlefield with neither side advancing or retreating, but of both of them in the same trench. I have to think about the idiom to mean that neither will budge.
PastsimpleMy mother tongue has a handful of idioms related to trenches and trench warfare. Do the examples below work in English as well?

1. Can I say this after I've returned to work from my holiday?

(I'm) back in the trenches.

2. When someone with no practical experience writes a highly theoretical essay about my job, can I say:

Well, he's never been in the trenches.

or

He doesn't know anything about the life in the trenches.

3. Let's say there's a man and woman, and their relationship is "mutilated" beyond hope of recovery, yet they are still staying together, living a life full of useless arguments, accusations, blame etc., can I describe this unhealthy state as "trench warfare"?

Or

A: I hear Dick and Jane are not on speaking terms.
B: Man, that's (complete) trench warfare, the thing between those two.


(trench warfare suggesting stalemate / state not likely to change in the near future)

Thanks in advance, as always.
My English is mostly Americanized with a little mix of British flavor. I used to love to watch "Benny Hill" and "Who is being Served" nearly every episode. That said, we have an expression "back to the grind" which is nearly the same as "trench". We may debate the degree of significance between "Grind" and "Trench" which is another topic

# 3 - My interpretation of "mutilated" is savagely tearing apart or butchering up something. I heard of tormented or estranged relationship but it's my first time seeing "mutilated" being used in reference to a relationship. Emotion: big smile
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