I have some of the questions below about the choice of a correct participle.

▪ He is rewarded from his hard work.

❶ ➠ His hard work was [rewarding/ rewarded]

▪ The hard work is rewarding and worthwhile.

❷ ➠ It is a [rewarding/ rewarded].

❸ ➠ a [rewarding/ rewarded] hard work.

▪ She started singing to the baby and was rewarded with a smile.

❹ ➠ It was a [rewarding/ rewarded] smile.

▪ Our patience was finally rewarded.

➠ It's a [rewarding/ rewarded] patience.

▪ They were rewarded by their patience.

❻ ➠ It's a [rewarding/ rewarded] patience.

The answers are as follows, ❶ rewarding, ❷ rewarding, ❸ rewarding, ❹ rewarding, ❺ rewarded, ❻ rewarding.

My problem starts with . Given the context, ❺ seems quite right, but "rewarding" still seems OK to me.

Could you help me?
With all those funny numbers, I am afraid to touch your post.
Sorry to trouble you, Mister Micawber.

But present participle and past participle questions are sometimes killing me.

For example, "loving" vs. "loved."

Here in a obituary you can see what I mean.

Brian Garner : Obituary

GARNER Brian On July 6th, 2011, suddenly in hospital, Brian, aged 90 years, of Hellifield, (formerly of Barnoldswick), beloved husband of the late Violet, much loved father of Michael and Helen and loving grandad of Anne and Mark.

It seems that Michael and Helen, the children of the deceased loved the deceased, and the deceased lover his grandchildren Anne and Mark very much.

Am I right in this inference?

With this added question, I hope somebody could give any opinion about this.

(I don't think this question is not good, but question is question. Sometimes there is a stupid question, but it's not a stupid question in the questioner's position. Thanks in advance.)
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GARNER Brian On July 6th, 2011, suddenly in hospital, Brian, aged 90 years, of Hellifield, (formerly of Barnoldswick), beloved husband of the late Violet, much loved father of Michael and Helen and loving grandad of Anne and Mark.

It seems that Michael and Helen, the children of the deceased loved the deceased, and the deceased loved his grandchildren Anne and Mark very much. Am I right in this inference?- Absolutely. And it is also true that Brian was loved by Violet.
Thanks as ever, Mister Micawber.
I can barely see numbers in the little circles, but some of the sentences seem strange to me. I'm afraid your problems start even before the red circle!

▪ He is rewarded from his hard work. -- No. You could say "he is rewarded for his hard work" (which corresponds to "his work was rewarded) or possibly "he felt rewarded by his hard work," (his work was rewarding) but I wouldn't say "he is rewarded from his hard work."

▪ The hard work is rewarding and worthwhile. Fine

❷ ➠ It is a [rewarding/ rewarded]. It is rewarding. (no "a.")

❸ ➠ a [rewarding/ rewarded] hard work. We would say "It is hard, rewarding work" (without "a.")

For the next few sentences -- you can say "It was a rewarding smile," but not "It was a rewarding/rewarded patience." I can't explain why at the moment, but I'll think about it and try to come back later and explain.
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Thank you for your concern, khoff.

Thanks.