+0
She was elegance on ice, her spirals superb, her skating sublime. That she was standing in the end didn't hurt, either.
Shizuka Arakawa made this one look easy.

Her brilliant performance Thursday night gave Japan its first medal of these Olympics -- a gold in the showcase event.

What a way to end a shutout!

"I'm just surprised right now," Arakawa said. "I can't find the words for it."

Try mesmerizing, even spellbinding.

Everything American champion Sasha Cohen and Russian star Irina Slutsukaya were not. They gave Arakawa plenty of help by tumbling to the ice often enough to make it a rout.


About 'try' above, what is it grammatically? I don't think it's imperative (or is it?). And it doesn't seem like a noun either---if it's a noun, it should be countabe; it should be 'a try', I think.
+0
First of all, a big CONGRATULATIONSto all of Japan for the phenomenal GOLD in ladies' figure skating, and the first medal of the 2006 Olympics!!! You guys can now breath easy and enjoy the games. Emotion: smile

"Try" is used as an imperative above. Since Arakawa said "surprised" and "can't find the words" the writer is suggesting more appropriate words. As in "Try using mesmerizing or even spellbinding!".

Compare the following situations below.
A: I don't sweat enough exercising on this tread mill.
B: Try running faster.

A: I can never wake up early in the morning.
B: Try going to bed sooner the night before!

Hope this helps.
Comments  
DanyooFirst of all, a big CONGRATULATIONSto all of Japan for the phenomenal GOLD in ladies' figure skating, and the first medal of the 2006 Olympics!!! You guys can now breath easy and enjoy the games. Emotion: smile


Thank you! We're really proud of her. She is pure 'gold'.

Danyoo
"Try" is used as an imperative above. Since Arakawa said "surprised" and "can't find the words" the writer is suggesting more appropriate words. As in "Try using mesmerizing or even spellbinding!".

Oh, it's the wirter's suggestion! I didn't notice that. Thank you!