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A lot of people hurried away when they saw we were going to try and interview them.

I found the above in my book. Is 'were going to try and intervew them' correct?

If it is correct, can I say try to interview instead of try and interview?

Thanks
LiJ
Comments  
Liveinjapan, you have found one of my pet peeves!

Personally, I think ONLY "try to" is correct, but I'm losing the battle, as "try and" creeps further and further into daily speech patterns.

Not only CAN you subsitute "to" for "and," but I really wish you would!
Grammar Geekas "try and" creeps further and further into daily speech patterns.

Hi,
really? I thought it was not used much in the US... I think I always hear "Try (d)uh do something" Emotion: smile

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Grammar Geek
Liveinjapan, you have found one of my pet peeves!

Personally, I think ONLY "try to" is correct, but I'm losing the battle, as "try and" creeps further and further into daily speech patterns.

Not only CAN you subsitute "to" for "and," but I really wish you would!

Thank you guys Emotion: smile You encourage me to try to use this, GG.

Thank you very much.
LiJ
LiveinjapanA lot of people hurried away when they saw we were going to try and interview them.

Hi CalifJim,

Can we write the above sentence as:

A lot of people hurried away when they saw we were going to try interviewing them.

?
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Yes. You can use try interviewing instead of try to interview (or try and interview).
However, with that substitution the idea of trying may be a bit half-hearted, because the meaning changes slightly.

I sense that if you try to do something, you do it with some real effort and determination with reasonable confidence of success. What you're trying to do is of interest in itself. On the other hand, if you try doing it, you are engaging in experimentation to see what might happen. More likely, what you try doing is secondary to a larger purpose.
_____

I'm going to try to lift this heavy table with one hand.

George tried to jump over that fence.
[He wanted to jump over it. He intended to jump over it. It's not a matter of what else might be accomplished by such an act.]
The little thief tried to leave the restaurant without paying.
[He intended not to pay. He was not going to pay. He started to leave. It's not a matter of the thief wondering about the consequences of such an act.]
______

The lock seems to be broken, so I'm going to try jiggling it with this key.

I don't know what to do with these invoices. I think I'll try asking the boss what to do.

Cheryl accidentally put too much lemon in the batter, so she tried adding more sugar.
[She wanted to adjust the flavor. Adding sugar was a means to making the adjustment, not something of interest in itself. It might not work, but it was worth a try.]
______

For this reason, I would not change the given sentence so that it contained try interviewing.

CJ