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I sit down to try to visualize

or

I sit down to try and visualize

??
Comments  
for me it is as broad as it is long, id est, they are interchangeable.
do not take it as a gospel truth, though.

inchoate
Hi guys,

In my opinion, 'try and . . .' is informal, and probably a bit substandard.

Best wishes, Clive
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To me, "try and do something" doesn't sound that informal. I usually choose it instead of "try to do something", even because (again, to me) it has a better sound.

Just my two cents though.

[8]
Argh! This is one of my MAJOR pet peeves. I do understand that "try and" is taking over spoken English, but I feel strongly that "try to" is the only acceptable way to say this.

I will attempt to [whatever]. I may not succeed. But I'm not going to do two things: to try AND to [whatever].

And yes, I know I'm probably the only one who feels strongly about it. But I do.
Prescriptive American grammars will tell you that only "try to" is correct.
I have seen a textbook in French to teach the French to speak British English, and the expression was given there quite explicitly as "try and". It was explained there as an exception to the use of the infinitive. The "try to" version was treated as if it were a less-than-useful variant if not actually wrong! Ever since then I have thought "try and" was British -- but I may be wrong.

CJ
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CalifJimI have thought "try and" was British -- but I may be wrong.
I'm a Brit and I've always been taught "try and..." is wrong, but I digress: if someone said "I'm going to try and succeed" stressing the "and" that would express determination rather than be incorrect.

Looked at in the past tense: "I tried to succeed" normally implies failure while "I tried and succeeded" can only mean success. This shows that in theory there can be only one possible outcome when using "and", which is why some people are reluctant to use this construction when discusing the future as either outcome is possible.
Grammar GeekArgh! This is one of my MAJOR pet peeves. I do understand that "try and" is taking over spoken English, but I feel strongly that "try to" is the only acceptable way to say this.

I will attempt to [whatever]. I may not succeed. But I'm not going to do two things: to try AND to [whatever].

And yes, I know I'm probably the only one who feels strongly about it. But I do.
I'm with you 100% on this one, GG. To try to do something is to make an attempt and either fail or succeed. To try and do something implies that it will in fact become reality. Can't stand it!