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This is a sentence written by a newspaper editor, commenting the election of Obama:

"
StartFragment>It's arguable that only Americans would choose to travel down rocky new roads with an apprentice as their commander-in-chief. Most people, Europeans anyway, would have hunkered down with the familiar imperfections of Hillary Clinton. EndFragment> "

The part in question:

"Europeans would have hunkered down with the familiar imperfections of Hillary Clinton. "

I am having a feeling that the writer is trying to say too much with too little. This is my guess:

A. In any case, the Europeans would rather have elected someone they are familiar with, despite her imperfections.

B. Although the Europeans are familiar with her imperfection, they would still have elected Hillary.

The combination of "hunkered down with" is rather usual.

what do you think?
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huangpengchengI am having a feeling that the writer is trying to say too much with too little.
I don't quite understand what you mean by this. The sentence seems well written to me.
huangpengcheng
A. In any case, the Europeans would rather have elected someone they are familiar with, despite her imperfections.

B. Although the Europeans are familiar with her imperfection, they would still have elected Hillary.

(A) paraphrases it nicely.
huangpengchengThe combination of "hunkered down with" is rather usual.
Did you mean to say "usual" or "unusual"?

Anyway, "to hunker down (with)" is a standard expression. See e.g. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hunker
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Sorry, let me try again.

I have no problem with "hunker down", however, I am not sure if you can hunker down "with" the "familiar imperfections of" someone, rather, hunker down with someone.

I suspect the writer was trying to say a few things more the sentence could handle, although the sentence is understandable. If you scrutinize the sentence a bit deeper, you may see my point.

Thanks for your help.
Right, I see what you're saying.

Personally I don't have a problem with it, and I think the sentence is fine. Yes, the literal meaning of "hunkering down" is that of physically crouching down, digging in, or whatever, but here the author obviously doesn't mean that. He's using the expression figuratively. Huge numbers of English words or phrases that express physical acts or situations have various levels of figurative meaning, and this is a case in point.