"Go straight down the road and turn the roundabout"

Is this correct?
I would have said "... go (a)round the roundabout"

"turning roundabouts" seems to me to be something that Incredible Hulks do.
I am in doubt because the "turn" phrase was in a book for students of English as a foreign language.
Would "turn" be american and "go round" be british?

Thanks for any insight

Paulo
1 2 3 4 5
"Go straight down the road and turn the roundabout" Is this correct? I would have said "... go (a)round the ... English as a foreign language. Would "turn" be american and "go round" be british? Thanks for any insight Paulo

If your referring to a traffic circle, I'm with you. However if you mean one of those wide spots at the terminus of a cul de dead end, I'd say "turn around". God I hate traffic circles.
tommy
"Go straight down the road and turn the roundabout" Is this correct? I would have said "... go (a)round the ... in a book for students of English as a foreign language. Would "turn" be american and "go round" be british?

The sentence can't be American, because "roundabout" is British English and not American English. Similar things to "roundabouts" are called "rotaries" and "traffic circles" in various regions of the US (there may be other terms, but I'm sure "roundabout" isn't one of them (except maybe in Orlando)).
So I can't really tell you whether the sentence is correct British English, as I am not a native speaker of BrE. However, it looks wrong to me. I think I'd say "go around" (if you go all the way around it) or "turn at".
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
"Go straight down the road and turn the roundabout" Is ... "go round" be british? Thanks for any insight Paulo

If your referring to a traffic circle, I'm with you. However if you mean one of those wide spots at the terminus of a cul de dead end, I'd say "turn around". God I hate traffic circles.

Have a look at:
http://www.jalsbo.com/bus/English roundabout.html
You go round the centre circle the wrong way.
Mike

M.J.Powell
"Go straight down the road and turn the roundabout" Is ... language. Would "turn" be american and "go round" be british?

The sentence can't be American, because "roundabout" is British English and not American English. Similar things to "roundabouts" are called ... wrong to me. I think I'd say "go around" (if you go all the way around it) or "turn at".

We Brits wouldn't say "Go straight down the road and turn the roundabout", partly because it's unidiomatic and partly because it's useless as a direction. We might say "...turn left at the roundabout" or "turn back on yourself at the roundabout". We might also say "take the first exit at the roundabout" or "go right round the roundabout". ("Around" is less frequently heard than "round" in this context.)

Matti
If your referring to a traffic circle, I'm with you. ... end, I'd say "turn around". God I hate traffic circles.

Have a look at: http://www.jalsbo.com/bus/English roundabout.html You go round the centre circle the wrong way. Mike M.J.Powell

Mike, I looked at your site and now I'm really intimidated. Who invented these intersections from hell anyway?
tommy
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Have a look at: http://www.jalsbo.com/bus/English roundabout.html You go round the centre circle the wrong way.

Mike, I looked at your site and now I'm really intimidated. Who invented these intersections from hell anyway?

I think it is an ingenious way to make traffic appear heavier than it really is, especially with the cars spinning around in those five small circles. Devilishly clever, those English.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Hi,
You go round the centre circle the wrong way.

If you're in the UK - let me know before you go around the roundabout the wrong way!
I'll avoid the area!
)
Kev
http://www.jalsbo.com/bus/English roundabout.html

I'm in the UK, and I've spoken to loads of people about this pic, and we are all of the opinion that it doesn't really exist - someone has created it.

However, I might be wrong.
Kev
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more