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Maybe who answers this question might be a bit knowledgeable in routers (the boxes that come from your DSL provider in their kits to allow you to connect faster into the internet). I think anyway it'd be enough to be more fluent in English than me to catch the sense of "TURN INTO A BRICK" in this response I obtained from the expert when asking what would happen if I switch the router off while upgrading its software; the response was:

... the window (of vulnerability) is virtually zero; we couldn't turn the box into a brick by doing power plugs in the lab.

thanks in advance for your help
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Hi,

You will technically "kill" the device, because during the software upgrade it
is forbidden to switch it off. You will not break anything, but with
unfinished software upgrade your router (hardware) will not be able to
boot anymore and be lying like a brick. (And you cannot repair that at
home by yourself).
Thanks stealth, I'm really excited that there are even router experts in this forum!

Anyway, and though what you state is technically speaking absolutely right, I reckon the specific meaning of not being able to "turn the box into a brick" in this context is just the opposite as I first was advised if I unplugged the power cable it should be back to normal (old software) condition upon boot, unless I pulled the plug within vulnarability window. And then that in my software scenario...

"the window is virtually zero; we couldn't TURN THE BOX INTO A BRICK by doing power plugs in the lab"

So doesn't it mean that, because of my router and its software version inside is so good, the lab testers haven't been able to "technically kill the device" even when switching off while upgrading?
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"... the window (of vulnerability) is virtually zero; we couldn't turn the box into a brick by doing power plugs in the lab."

This sentence means "There is almost no danger. You can switch the router off and still won't do any harm to your electronic device".