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Hello, everyone,

“Imagine something secretly entering your body and controlling your behavior, turning you into one of those zombies from science fiction movies. Does that sound creepy? That's exactly how a parasitic fungus species called the “zombie ant fungus,” inhabiting tropical forests around the world, attacks ant colonies. What happens is that when spores from the fungus land on an ant searching for food in the forest, it infects the ant, hijacks its central nervous system, and controls its brain with a special chemical. The victim doesn't act like an ant but like a zombie: it stops searching for food for its colony, and instead climbs up a tree and holds onto a leaf or a branch, where it is finally killed by the fungus. Soon, a stalk of spores grows out of the back of the ant's head, from which more spores can access more ants under the tree, a cruel but very effective way of expanding the fungus' territory.“

1. I understand the construction - 'imagine + ing' means 'picture + gerund'. Since I think the three ‘-ing’s above underlined are in a parallel structure, I don't understand why the author didn't write, "Imagine something secretly entering your body<,> controlling your behavior <and> turning you ~ " (I mean this should read not 'A and B, C' but 'A, B, and C').

2. Is there any possibility that the clause - ‘turning you into one of those zombies from science fiction movies’ is functioning as an adverbial participle one?

Would appreciate your valuable explanations.

* source; from our local textbook

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deepcosmos

1. I understand the construction - 'imagine + ing' means 'picture + gerund'. Since I think the three ‘-ing’s above underlined are in a parallel structure, I don't understand why the author didn't write, "Imagine something secretly entering your body<,> controlling your behavior <and> turning you ~ " (I mean this should read not 'A and B, C' but 'A, B, and C').

2. Is there any possibility that the clause - ‘turning you into one of those zombies from science fiction movies’ is functioning as an adverbial participle one?

The way it comes across to me is that the first two participle clauses are adjectival and the third is adverbial.

1. something entering your body
2. something controlling your behavior
3. thereby/thus/and as a result: turning you into one of those zombies from science fiction movies

I get this impression because the writer grouped 1 and 2 as he did, and the writer may have grouped the clauses as he did because he conceptualized the three actions in the same way.

CJ

+1

The sequence is a logical progression. Here is a paraphrase (my interpretation)

Here are two actions in time order:

First, the alien enters your body.
Second, it starts to take control over you and succeeds.

The next thing that happens is different; it is a consequence of the other two.

Third, the result of this strange behavior is that other people perceive you as a zombie.

The author wanted to distinguish the three actions. So the order of clauses is A and B, [resulting in C.]

That was the writer's choice.

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Comments  
deepcosmos

Hello, everyone,

“Imagine something secretly entering your body and controlling your behavior, turning you into one of those zombies from science fiction movies. Does that sound creepy?

Would appreciate your valuable explanations.

* source; from our local textbook

I see that you have asked this question on three grammar websites.

I think this is discourteous of you. Why should respondents bother to answer your question if you are simultaneously seeking the same information elsewhere?

You should ask your question on a single website and await an answer. Only then, and if you think the answer fails to address your concern, should you proceed to another website for an alternative answer, although it may be the same as the first one.

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anonymousI see that you have asked this question on three grammar websites.I think this is discourteous of you. Why should respondents bother to answer your question if you are simultaneously seeking the same information elsewhere? You should ask your question on a single website and await an answer. Only then, and if you think the answer fails to address your concern, should you proceed to another website for an alternative answer, although it may be the same as the first one.

Hello, Anon, I would like to ask you to listen to me in open mind and tell you my reasons why I post the same question onto a few grammar webs.

I’ve been extremely interested in English grammar only in my life as an EFL learner. Before I joined Grammar web, I’ve been familiar with the traditional grammar only.

Since I joined these webs, I was surprised to find various replies to one question depending on the respondents’ view of point, their preference to traditional grammar or modern one, and their native language – American English or British one, etc.

Thus, I’ve preferred to get as many replies as possible from my pure interest in learning only in order to see my question in the respondents’ various perspective and also hoped to communicate with as many respondents as possible with no other intention. Also, I’ve sincerely appreciated, valued all the replies I got and respected their opinion as it stands, since they have their own perspective.

Though I’ve got various replies, I’m sure I’ve never taken advantage of any reply so far. For example, I’ve never quoted certain reply to the other forum to ask respondents to compare it.

I think the moderator will warn me accordingly, if my style on a forum is against their policy.

anonymous

I see that you have asked this question on three grammar websites.

I think this is discourteous of you. Why should respondents bother to answer your question if you are simultaneously seeking the same information elsewhere?

You should ask your question on a single website and await an answer. Only then, and if you think the answer fails to address your concern, should you proceed to another website for an alternative answer, although it may be the same as the first one.

Every few years this kind of comment comes up.

Personally, if I want some work done on my house — painting, repairs, etc. — I get an estimate from at least three different businesses. If I'm unsure of how to do something, I ask several different friends about it. If I want to buy clothes, I go to several different shops to see what's available and how prices vary.

I don't see anything radically different about asking grammar questions on different websites. And besides, all of those websites are happy to have traffic on their sites. It represents income and status.

We are a smaller forum than many, and we can use the traffic on our site, so please don't scare our forum members away with this kind of talk. I suppose you're making the same comments on all those other forums, too. Are you trying to bully people off all these forums?

If you see the same question on another website, and for some bizarre reason, you don't approve, you do have the option not to answer it, you know.

CJ

CalifJim
anonymous

I see that you have asked this question on three grammar websites.

I think this is discourteous of you. Why should respondents bother to answer your question if you are simultaneously seeking the same information elsewhere?

You should ask your question on a single website and await an answer. Only then, and if you think the answer fails to address your concern, should you proceed to another website for an alternative answer, although it may be the same as the first one.


We are a smaller forum than many, and we can use the traffic on our site, so please don't scare our forum members away with this kind of talk. I suppose you're making the same comments on all those other forums, too. Are you trying to bully people off all these forums?

If you see the same question on another website, and for some bizarre reason, you don't approve, you do have the option not to answer it, you know.

CJ

Certainly not. Another site I looked at told the user to wait until they had received an answer on another forum where they had asked the same question. They called it being courteous, and so do I.

This particular user has a habit of doing something similar, which is why I mentioned it.

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anonymousI see that you have asked this question on three grammar websites.I think this is discourteous of you. Why should respondents bother to answer your question if you are simultaneously seeking the same information elsewhere?

Good gravy! An anonymous user hiding behind the veil of anonymity has the chutzpah to advise the "rules of the road" for our forums. Please leave these sorts of requests and comments to the moderators.

anonymousYou should ask your question on a single website and await an answer.

What if no answer is forthcoming? How long should they wait?