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Is TV dinner already a "dead word"?

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Snappy

Is TV dinner already a "dead word"?

No. Not as far as I know.

https://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=%22TV+dinner%22&l=0

CJ

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Snappy

Is TV dinner already a "dead word"?

By the way, are you talking about words which are no longer used or about words which are used too often? Both of these groups are called "dead words".

In my answer above I assumed the first definition, but as it turns out, "TV dinner" is certainly not a dead word in the second sense either.

CJ

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Thank you. A friend of mine said so. She seems to think that it is a word not used too often.

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Snappy

Thank you. A friend of mine said so. She seems to think that it is a word not used too often.

It is not what it used to be. In the American Fifties, the modern household had TV tables, plastic trays on folding legs the family could eat their TV dinner from, sitting on the couch in front of the TV. The TV dinner itself was a flat, compartmented, rectangular aluminum affair with a tinfoil (also aluminum) cover crimped in place. You could perform this ritual in those days because the advertisers had not yet realized that you could show people eight minutes of commercials twice during a half-hour show, and they wouldn't storm the TV station with pitchforks and torches.