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Which sentence (1 or 2) is more common?

1. Our house is twice as big as theirs.
2. Our house is two times bigger than theirs.

1. It was a few times as difficult as I expected.
2. It was a few times more difficult than I expected.

Thank you in advance.
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1. Our house is twice as big as theirs. This one
2. Our house is two times bigger than theirs.

1. It was a few times as difficult as I expected.
2. It was a few times more difficult than I expected.

Neither of these sound idiomatic. I'd say

It was a bit / a lot more difficult than I expected.

Clive

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What can I say if one of the houses is three or five times (I don’t know exactly) bigger than the other one? Can I use “several times”?

1. Our house is several times as big as theirs.
2. Our house is several times bigger than theirs.

Or
1. I’ve got several times as much money as him.
2. I’ve got several times more many than him.
Hi,

What can I say if one of the houses is three or five times (I don’t know exactly) bigger than the other one? Can I use “several times”?

1. Our house is several times as big as theirs.
2. Our house is several times bigger than theirs.


Yes, these are OK.

Or
1. I’ve got several times as much money as him.
2. I’ve got several times more money than him.


I suppose you could say these things, but they sound a little awkward to me.

More often, you'd hear simply 'I've got a lot more money than him'.

Best wishes, Clive
When the number is two, "twice as big" is more common. When the number is bigger, "times bigger" is more common, but it doesn't mean the same thing, even though most people are confused about the difference.

"Two times bigger" is the same as "200% bigger", which means three times as big. If you aren't convinced, consider that 100% bigger is twice as big.
If you think that "Two times bigger" is not the same as "200% bigger", few people would agree with you.
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Really? I had never realized that. When I use or hear this kind of sentence I justunderstand that something is bigger than the other.
1. Our house is twice as big as theirs.

2. It was a few times more difficult than I expect.
I disagree with that. They are often used inter-changeably to mean the same thing. Sure it might be by accident, but many people, when they say "Two times bigger" they mean "twice as big as". 100% bigger in both cases. So what grammar books say is different than how the expression is really used, in my opinion.
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AnonymousI disagree with that. They are often used inter-changeably to mean the same thing. Sure it might be by accident, but many people, when they say "Two times bigger" they mean "twice as big as". 100% bigger in both cases. So what grammar books say is different than how the expression is really used, in my opinion.
I don't see any grammatical problem with using 'two times bigger' but saying that to mean anything other than 'three times as big' would be mathematically incorrect.
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