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The first question.

I had a dispute with my English teacher. She told me that "am I not" is old fashioned and not used anymore and that "aren't I" is better to be used, but I don't agree with her at all. In my opinion, "am I not"(by example, in "I am your teacher, am I not?") is more grammatically correct than the form "aren't I" which makes no sense for me, at all.
The pronom "am" is used for the first person, not "are".

But anyway, what is your opinion about: "am I not", "aren't I", "ain't I" and "amn't I"?

The second question.

Should I use "shall/I shan't" or "will/won't" for the first person? Once again, in my opinion, the first one is more grammatically corect.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
GlumflakeShe told me that "am I not" is old fashioned and not used anymore and that it is better to use "aren't I" is better to be used
I agree that it's somewhat old-fashioned, in the sense that nobody uses it much anymore. "aren't I?" is the most used form these days. "am I not?" sounds very haughty to my ear.
Glumflakeshould I use "shall/I shan't" or "will/won't" for the first person?
Please don't use "shall" or "shan't" at all when you visit the United States. It will sound ridiculous. Emotion: sad
Glumflake in my opinion, the first one is more grammatically correct.
What are the copyright dates on the books you're getting your information from? If I were you, I'd check the dates and update my books if necessary, because these ideas seem more appropriate for grammarians who lived 50 to 75 years ago.

CJ
fivejedjonI take it then then you do not accept such forms as "don't they?" and "Isn't he?" as tag questions in formal writing.
I don't see these kinds of contractions are appropriate anywhere in formal writing, whether in tag qustions or anywhere else.
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CalifJimI agree that it's somewhat old-fashioned, in the sense that nobody uses it much anymore.
I take it you mean when used as a tag question. I mean, you presumably have no objection to "Why am I not surprised?" or "Am I not allowed in here?", do you? Or do you?
GPYI take it you mean when used as a tag question.
That's right.
GPYI mean, you presumably have no objection to "Why am I not surprised?" or "Am I not allowed in here?"
Correct. No objection.

CJ
GPYI don't see these kinds of contractions are appropriate anywhere in formal writing, whether in tag qustions or anywhere else.
Fine. I just got the impression that you considered aren't I to be somehow a lower-register form than other contractions. I was clearly mistaken.
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fivejedjonFine. I just got the impression that you considered aren't I to be somehow a lower-register form than other contractions. I was clearly mistaken.
Well, actually, in writing, I kind of do see it as slightly lower register, even though there may not be any better alternative in non-formal situations. However, that wasn't the specific motivation for my saying that it should not be used in formal writing. I think the same would apply to all contractions.
Thank you for correction, I was in a rush when I wrote this. Emotion: smile

Yes, I know it is more used that "aren't I", but I've talked about which one is more grammatically correct.

Honestly, I do not really care what the people of US would think or say if I use "shall/shan't". I'm more interested in british people's opinion. I hope that I wasn't rude or something right now.

I haven't opened a grammar book since 2 or 3 years ago. Emotion: big smile

Thank you again for answering me!
Thanks to every each one for yours answers! I truly appreciate!
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GlumflakeHonestly, I do not really care what the people of US would think or say if I use "shall/shan't". I'm more interested in british people's opinion. I hope that I wasn't rude or something right now.
In the UK, "shall" is fairly common in questions like "Shall I/we ... ?". It is seen in formal writing, e.g. legal writing, to show what is mandated to happen, e.g. "The two parties shall not ... blah blah". It is sometimes used to talk about one's future intentions, e.g. "I shall go and give him a piece of my mind", but this use may be declining and may not always sound natural, depending on the situation. The may be idiomatic quirks, so if you have a specific sentence or situation in mind, it would be best to post the full thing.
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