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The first question.

I had a dispute with my English teacher. She told me that "am I not" is old fashioned and not used anymore and that "aren't I" is better to be used, but I don't agree with her at all. In my opinion, "am I not"(by example, in "I am your teacher, am I not?") is more grammatically correct than the form "aren't I" which makes no sense for me, at all.
The pronom "am" is used for the first person, not "are".

But anyway, what is your opinion about: "am I not", "aren't I", "ain't I" and "amn't I"?

The second question.

Should I use "shall/I shan't" or "will/won't" for the first person? Once again, in my opinion, the first one is more grammatically corect.
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Comments  (Page 3) 
No, I do not have a specific sentence or situation in mind. But, thank you a lot for explanation! Emotion: smile
GPY I kind of do see it as slightly lower register
I'd be interested to know why you think that. This Oxford Dictionaries site has it has 'standard English', and this BBC site gives it as the standard contracted form of 'am I not'.
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fivejedjonI'd be interested to know why you think that.
It's probably because it suffers from the unfortunate spelling that makes it look faintly illiterate.
GlumflakeHonestly, I do not really care what the people of US would think or say
That's OK. I don't care either!

However, you should note that if you counted all the people in the world who speak English other than the American variety, that would still not be enough to match the number of people who speak American English. Emotion: smile

CJ
GlumflakeShould I use "shall/I shan't" or "will/won't" for the first person? Once again, in my opinion, the first one is more grammatically corect.
'Shall' as a first-person verb expressing certainty about a future action is not, and never has been 'more grammatically correct'. It was a form used by a small minority of English people in influential positions in society and academia in the sixteenth to twentieth centurie. As most of the people writing style guides and grammars were members of this group, teachers in the public schools (= elite private schools in Britain!) and grammar schools taught it as the 'correct' form. It was for many years a shibboleth (definition #2 here ).

As an elderly speaker of BrE educated at an independent grammar school, I still use 'shall', but there aren't many like me left. Only a tiny minority of speakers under the age of about 50 still use it as a future form

We do still use it in offers and suggestions: Shall I open the window for you? Shall we go out to dinner this evening.
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CalifJimThat's OK. I don't care either!However, you should note that if you counted all the people in the world who speak English other than the American variety, that would still not be enough to match the number of people who speak American English. CJ
That's right. And America is where it's at!

The British Isles . . . As my eldest daughter likes to say . . . "Sooooo vieux jeu!" Emotion: smile
@CalifJim

Oh, my God. It's quite funny that we speak about British English and American English, isn't it? There is only English. If we see this from a realist point of view, we can say that there are a lot of different dialects of this languages all over the world, including Great Britain and United States of America. Should we name every each dialect somehow? I don't think so.

Anyway, how did you come to this conclusion, if I may ask? The conclusion that there are more people who speak "American" English than people who speak "British" English? On what continents is the English from US so popular? Europe, where the most of people learn "British" English to take the Cambridge or IELTS? Africa, which was filled with British colonies? Australia? I might laugh. Not to forget that India(1,3 billion population) was part of British Colonial Empire.
@fivejedjon

Hmm, I see. Thank you for the explanation!
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GlumflakeShould we name every each dialect somehow?
We linguists do.
GlumflakeAnyway, how did you come to this conclusion, if I may ask? The conclusion that there are more people who speak "American" English than people who speak "British" English?
Well, according to these figures , moire than 200 million people speak AmE, and only 55 million BrE.
GlumflakeNot to forget that India(1,3 billion population) was part of British Colonial Empire
Only about 125 million people there speak English, and it's Indian English, not British English.
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