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The first question.

I had a dispute with my English teacher. She told me that "am I not" is old fashioned and not used anymore and that "aren't I" is better to be used, but I don't agree with her at all. In my opinion, "am I not"(by example, in "I am your teacher, am I not?") is more grammatically correct than the form "aren't I" which makes no sense for me, at all.
The pronom "am" is used for the first person, not "are".

But anyway, what is your opinion about: "am I not", "aren't I", "ain't I" and "amn't I"?

The second question.

Should I use "shall/I shan't" or "will/won't" for the first person? Once again, in my opinion, the first one is more grammatically corect.
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Comments  (Page 4) 
Glumflakehow did you come to this conclusion
It was not I who came to this conclusion. It's based on data. See Wikipedia for the details.
Glumflakethere are more people who speak "American" English than people who speak "British" English?
I didn't say "British English". That would leave out the Canadians, the Australians, the Indians, etc.
Glumflakethere are a lot of different dialects
I've been told that "dialect" is the wrong word. I have always seen "variety" encouraged as the more proper term when it comes to the distribution of various Englishes.
GlumflakeThere is only English.
Yes, I suppose so, especially if we consider only the written form. But there are some cases where two different varieties are almost mutually unintelligible. I myself am hard pressed to understand a Brooklyn accent comfortably, for example.

Of course, English originated in England, so some irony was involved when an American friend of mine who had just returned from England decried, "And those people claim they're native speakers of English?" Emotion: big smile

CJ
I don't think you can seriously speak of Indian English or, for that matter, Singaporean English. English there is used for government and administration, and to address the different language of all the ethnic groups. I don't think most Indians would say that English is their native language.
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XerxesI don't think you can seriously speak of Indian English
On the contrary, Indian English is a well recognised variety.
XerxesI don't think most Indians would say that English is their native language.
Not most, but there are quite a few curious examples where the only language they know is Indian English. They learned it from birth. They simply cannot express themselves in Hindi or in any of the other native languages of India. Ask them what their native language is, and they say "English".

CJ
CalifJimOf course, English originated in England,
True, but we need to remember that modern British English dialects are as different from The English of the early 16th century as modern American English dialects are. No variety has any claim to be the 'original' or 'best'.
CalifJim I have always seen "variety" encouraged as the more proper term when it comes to the distribution of various Englishes.
We tend to use 'variety' for national versions and 'dialects; for versions within a country but there seems to me a degree of overlap.

I am sometimes amused by the way we often lump the very different Scottish, Welsh and Irish varieties/dialects into 'British English'.
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GPYOn the contrary, Indian English is a well recognised variety.
Quite. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_English
fivejedjonI am sometimes amused by the way we often lump the very different Scottish, Welsh and Irish varieties/dialects into 'British English'.
Don't worry! I, for one, would never do such a thing! Emotion: tmi

CJ
CalifJimNot most, but there are quite a few curious examples where the only language they know is Indian English. They learned it from birth. They simply cannot express themselves in Hindi or in any of the other native languages of India. Ask them what their native language is, and they say "English".
Sure, but millions of Indians do not.
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GlumflakeOh, my God. It's quite funny that we speak about British English and American English, isn't it? There is only English.
George Bernard Shaw said that America and Great Britain are "two nations divided by a common language". So I wouldn't be so dismissive about that.
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