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The first question.

I had a dispute with my English teacher. She told me that "am I not" is old fashioned and not used anymore and that "aren't I" is better to be used, but I don't agree with her at all. In my opinion, "am I not"(by example, in "I am your teacher, am I not?") is more grammatically correct than the form "aren't I" which makes no sense for me, at all.
The pronom "am" is used for the first person, not "are".

But anyway, what is your opinion about: "am I not", "aren't I", "ain't I" and "amn't I"?

The second question.

Should I use "shall/I shan't" or "will/won't" for the first person? Once again, in my opinion, the first one is more grammatically corect.
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Comments  (Page 6) 
CalifJimThat's irrelevant.
Well, no, it is relevant because your example (African Americans) is not comparable. When one receives American citizenship, one has to pass the naturalization test, which includes English. In other words, someone who doesn't speak English cannot become an American. For obvious (and good) reasons that does not hold for any other things (such as racial background, etc.).
CalifJimPerhaps the crux of the division here is the definition of "entertain the notion of", which to me means "accept the idea of", but which may mean something different to you.
I agree with that. That was poorly worded on my part.
Xerxessomeone who doesn't speak English cannot become an American.
That's news to me. If that were true, our election ballots (not to mention informational notices about garbage collection schedules) in California would not have to be written in English, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Chinese. Yes. Four languages. And don't forget that those who are born in the U.S., even into non-English-speaking families, are automatically U.S. citizens, though we can quibble over whether this latter process constitutes "becoming" an American.
XerxesWhen one receives American citizenship, one has to pass the naturalization test, which includes English.
Quite a minimal amount of English as I understand it.
__________

On the other hand, I don't think any of that is germane to your point.

I think what you mean is that you don't feel (maybe don't know) that Indian English has enough differentiating characteristics to qualify it as another "variety of English". I suspect, however, that a thorough examination of English as spoken in India would reveal those characteristics. The different pronunciation is the most obvious factor, but there are also local borrowings that make the vocabulary a little different as well, of the same status as the "lorry/ truck" difference between the U.S. and Britain. You'd have to ask a proper linguist for all the relevant details.

CJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
CJ, I concede defeat!
XerxesCJ, I concede defeat!
Unacceptable! You must fight to the death! Emotion: smile

Frankly, I think we've exhausted the subject by now anyway, if not ourselves.

Enjoy the rest of the morning, evening, or whatever it is where you are. Emotion: nodding

CJ
CalifJimUnacceptable! You must fight to the death! Frankly, I think we've exhausted the subject by now anyway, if not ourselves.Enjoy the rest of the morning, evening, or whatever it is where you are.
Thank you, and you as well! Emotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Emotion: clap