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She said she (hadn't, hasn't) seen him since she left Moscow.

We (had lived, have lived) in this flat since we got married.

In the test the right answers are hasn't seen and had lived. Why? The two sentences have the same construction (since).

(Men's, men's) chancing room.

I think, man's.

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red train 520In the test the right answers are hasn't seen and had lived. Why? The two sentences have the same construction (since).

If I were taking that test, I would have put two wrong answers.

red train 520She said she (hadn't, hasn't) seen him since she left Moscow.

Because she is talking in the past, "hadn't" seems a better fit, but there is nothing wrong with "hasn't" in some perfectly ordinary contexts.

red train 520We (had lived, have lived) in this flat since we got married.

"Had lived" requires a special context in the absence of which I would answer "have lived". But both are perfectly natural.

red train 520(Men's, men's) chancing room.

You mean "changing room", of course. It's "men's changing room". There is no reason. That is just the ordinary way of saying it.

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red train 520In the test the right answers are hasn't seen and had lived.

Are you sure those are right answers? They look more like the wrong answers to me.

CJ

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Comments  

I am sure. But perhaps the creator of the test was wrong.

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