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1. ..., unlike what I discovered here in America, any junior high school
student, as stupid as he might be, can precisely discuss the geographical and historical features of all countries in Africa, in addition to any other
country with which Guinea is interacting.
Can I just say "stupid as he might be" instead of "as stupid as he might be"?

2. As big a man as he is, Mr. Hennessey is dwarfed by the rusted metal, old wood and mounds of bluestone scrap of his past.
Can we say "Big man as he is" instead of "As big a man as he is"?

http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/84404-big-man-he.html
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Comments  
To be sure, include the first 'as'. It is probably quite common, especially in casual speech or writing, to leave it out. I'm not prepared to tell you if it is considered correct or not.
PhilipTo be sure, include the first 'as'. It is probably quite common, especially in casual speech or writing, to leave it out. I'm not prepared to tell you if it is considered correct or not.

Do you mean you are not willing to tell me if it is considered correct or not?
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To me,
"any junior high school student, stupid though he might be..."
sounds OK. (But I would prefer using "ill educated" rather than stupid, since it seems to be making a comment on the educational system, not the IQ of a particular person).)

The big man that he is, Mr Hennessey....
As big a man as he is, Mr Hennessey....
Both sound OK, but I'm not sure of the grammar. Perhaps the first is an appositive phrase.
What does "As big a man as he is" mean? Does it mean "Though he is a big man"?
Yes, but it emphasizes the contrast between the size of the man and the size of the object he was dwarfed by.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
sitifan
PhilipTo be sure, include the first 'as'. It is probably quite common, especially in casual speech or writing, to leave it out. I'm not prepared to tell you if it is considered correct or not.

Do you mean you are not willing to tell me if it is considered correct or not?

I'm always willing. Here, I simply do not know, I'm not prepared with the background or that portion of the book of rules.
What is bluestone scrap of his past?
I was taught that to be prepared to dosomthing meant to be willing to do something. Thank you for your help.

be prepared to do sth to be willing, or happy to agree to do something:
Would you be prepared to help me get things ready for the party?
People are not really prepared to talk about these kinds of personal problems.
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=62486&dict=CALD
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