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To those whom would stop for a look, though it is not a funny story, hehe

"Some people say that it is wrong for the government to spend much money on artistic projects, such as paintings and sculptures in public places."

i know that "in public places" play an attributive part in this sentence. But which phrase does it modify? "artistic projects" or "paintings and sculptures"?

here's another question:

which of the following two is more ok? i mean which is more consistent with the english way:

1. As they had finished the assignments, the children went out for fun.

2. As the children had finished the assignments, they went out for fun.

thanks

chengwei liu
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Comments  
I think.

You do not need a comma preceding such as.

Such as introduces example(s).

In public places, an adverbial phrase, modfies on artistic projects, an adjective phrase.

Both of them are fine. The second one is that more people use it, I guess.

We all know the pronoun refers back to "children". Pronoun takes places another nouns to help us avoid redunacies.
Welkins2139
1. As they had finished the assignments, the children went out for fun.

2. As the children had finished the assignments, they went out for fun.

Both of them are fine. The second one is that more people use it, I guess.

The second sentence is more commonly used, not the first. In fact, most teachers prefer the second sentence.
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artistic projects, such as paintings and sculptures in public places."

to spend on such artistic projects as paintings and sculptures in public places.

the use of comma before such as is acceptable.

1. As they had finished the assignments, the children went out for fun.

2. As the children had finished the assignments, they went out for fun.

both are equally fine.

a proform may precede what it refers to.
Some people say that it is wrong for the government to spend much money on artistic projects, such as paintings and sculptures in public places."

"In public places, an adverbial phrase, modfies on artistic projects, an adjective phrase. "

"In public places, an adverbial phrase"

Yes, a locative adjunct

"in public places" "modfies on artistic projects, an adjective phrase" No

it modifies "paintings and sculptures"

artistic project is not an adjectival phrase.

"Project" is the head and is a noun, so it is a noun phrase.
InchoateknowledgeSome people say that it is wrong for the government to spend much money on artistic projects, such as paintings and sculptures in public places."

"In public places, an adverbial phrase, modfies on artistic projects, an adjective phrase. "

"In public places, an adverbial phrase"

Yes, a locative adjunct

"in public places" "modfies on artistic projects, an adjective phrase" No

it modifies "paintings and sculptures"

artistic project is not an adjectival phrase.

"Project" is the head and is a noun, so it is a noun phrase.

I disagree.

If you take away such as paintings and sculptures, it will be on artistic projects in public places. In public places, adverb phrase, modifies, On artistic projects, adjective phrases.

on artistic projects modfies money.
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Leolyy"Some people say that it is wrong for the government to spend much money on artistic projects, such as paintings and sculptures in public places."
i know that "in public places" play an attributive part in this sentence. But which phrase does it modify? "artistic projects" or "paintings and sculptures"?
It modifies paintings and sculptures

Otherwise they would have said:
"Some people say that it is wrong for the government to spend much money on artistic projects in public places, such as paintings and sculptures"

As you can see, proximity is very important.
I disagree with Marius Hancu. It's not obligatory to change the word order; a comma (or not) after "sculptures" is enough to clarify the meaning.
J LewisI disagree with Marius Hancu. It's not obligatory to change the word order; a comma (or not) after "sculptures" is enough to clarify the meaning.
Yes, a comma would do do. But wouldn't be more clear than my version, IMO.
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