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Hi.

How can we have two relative clauses in one sentence.

The context is as below;

A. I want to buy that book.

B. The book is cheap.

C. The book offers great information.

I can think of two ways for that which I post here.

I want to buy that book which offers great information and which is cheap.

I want to buy that book which is cheap and offers great information.

I want to buy that book which offers great information and is cheap.

I would be grateful if you could explain me by grammar rules rather than the way it sounds to you.

I want to learn the rule so I can tell my students.

What about the following sentence;

'Would you tell me the name of the company which offers quick response time and which is suitable for investment.'

can we omit the second which? Should we omit both which and to be after and?

Thanks for your time and help
Comments  
hrsaneiI want to buy that book which offers great information and which is cheap.
I want to buy that book which is cheap and offers great information.
I want to buy that book which offers great information and is cheap.
I have no idea how natural the sentences sound to native speakers but they are all equally grammatical as they all have the conjunction and. And is a coordinating conjunction and repeating the relative which is unnecessary - but of course correct. I cannot think of any rule here other than the fact that and is a coordinating conjunction, which means that it begins a clause that is syntactically similar to the previous one.
hrsaneiWould you tell me the name of the company which offers quick response time and [which] is suitable for investment.'
There is no need to repeat the relative but if you want to, you can of course do that. You can't omit the is after which. You cannot say: ... which offers quick response time and suitable for investment.

CB
hrsaneiA. I want to buy that book.
B. The book is cheap.
C. The book offers great information.
In cases like this, if you want to include multiple points in a single sentence, we could say: I want to buy that book, which only is very informative but also is on sale. Cheap - offers a sense of lacking in quality and generally has a negative connotation. inexpensive, low-cost would be alternatives.
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quote user="Cool Breeze"]
hrsanei You cannot say: ... which offers quick response time and suitable for investment. CB
Thanks Cool Breeze for your response.

But why can't we say which offers quick response time and suitable for investment.

In adjectival clauses, we can omit relative pronoun and the verb to be, therefore which is can be omitted in the above sentence. Is here an exception to this rule?

Thanks for your time and help
Thank you very much for your response and useful suggestion dimsumexpress.
hrsaneiBut why can't we say which offers quick response time and suitable for investment.
Suitable is an adjective and thus cannot act as the object of the verb offers. Time is a noun and therefore qualifies as the object of a verb.

You cannot say:

He offers happy to me.

You can say:

He offers money to me.

CB
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Thanks Cool Breeze. I got it.