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Are following sentences correct?

1. Bushes and shrubs, interweaving with ravines and gorges, are typical of that region.

2. This is the special place on the world's cultural map from which the whole generation of creators and animators come from. (Can it be "from" here at the end of this sentence or should it be "...and animators come"?)
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Here are some suggestions:
1. Ravines and gorges covered with bushes and shrubs are typical of that region. or

Ravines and gorges supporting sparse vegetation consisting of bushes and shrubs are typical of that region.

2. This is the special place on the world's cultural map from which the whole generation of creators and animators come..
"from which" is the complete prepositional phrase. You can also write:
The whole generation of creators and animators come from this special place on the world's cultural map.
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Thanks for replies, anyway, is the first sentence gramatically correct? (even if it sounds weird).
Well, structurally, it is OK, but semantically, it does not make sense. Bushes cannot interweave with gorges.
I wanted to translate some kind of poetic language and in my language it sounds weird as well.

Is this sentence correct: "Ravines and gorges are interspersed with shrubs and bushes typical of that region."?
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